27 January 1945

27 January 1945


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27 January 1945

Eastern Front

IV SS Panzer Corps attack in Hungary, launched on 18 January, finally defeated.

Soviet troops capture Memel and Poprad (Slovakia)

Western Front

British troops capture Odilienburg

French troops capture Holtzwihr

American troops attack between Roer and Wurm

War at Sea

German submarine U-1172 sunk with all hands in St. George's Channel



27th January 1945

Twelfth Air Force. Bad weather during morning causes all medium bombers to abort except for an attack on bridge at Bressana Bottarone. XXII Tactical Air Command fighters and fighter-bombers continue interdiction of command with good results against motor transport, trains, rail lines, bridges, and storage dumps. P-47 Thunderbolt fighters of 57th Fighter Group destroy oil plant near Fornovo di Taro.

Fifteenth Air Force. For sixth consecutive day bad weather restricts operations to reconnaissance and escort missions.

Tenth Air Force. 30 United States Army Air Force (USAAF) fighter-bombers support ground forces at Man Sak, Molo Ywama, area South of Molo, and area South of Banwe. 8 others knock out bypass bridge at Bawgyo. About 100 fighter-bombers hit troop concentrations, supplies, and targets at or near Man Kyan, Kuinkuiloi, Hohkun, Pongalau, Hsenwi, Kutkai, Hsatong, Ping hoi, Ho-mong, Padon, and Kyaunghen. Transports fly 527 sorties to advanced bases and over forward areas, landing men and landing and dropping supplies.

Fourteenth Air Force. 22 United States Army Air Force (USAAF) P-40 fighters and P-51 Mustang fighter-bombers attack locomotives, trucks, and shipping at Sinsiang, Kihsien, and Nanking, from Taiyuan to Puchou, and East of Yiyang.

Far East Air Force (FEAF). United States Army Air Force (USAAF) B-24 Liberator heavy bombers pound Canacao seaplane base, Cavite, and Grande Island while B-25 Mitchell medium bombers hit Cabcaben and airfield at Calingatan. Other Far East Air Force (FEAF) aircraft continue small-scale strikes against numerous other airfields, town areas, gun emplacements, harbours, and command and transportation targets throughout Luzon.

Twentieth Air Force. By this date the complete forward detachments of the 4 B-29 Superfortress heavy bomber groups in the Chengtu area have evacuated their bases and moved to more permanent bases in India. This move complies with Joint Chiefs of Staff directive formulated on 16 December 1944 and received on 18 December 1944. The long existing understanding that XX Bomber Command might be moved from China-Burma-India (CBI) when more convenient bases are available is thus put into its initial stage when XX Bomber Command's Commanding General, General LeMay, and Joint Chiefs of Staff agree that on logistical grounds XX Bomber Command's operating scheme is basically unsound, a situation made more apparent when in November the Japanese had overrun Luchou and Yungning and threatened Kunming. This development necessitated air tonnage flown over the Hump being diverted to Chinese ground forces and Fourteenth Air Force, resulting in curtailed supplies to XX Bomber Command and providing the catalyst for beginning movement of the command from China. 22 XX Bomber Command B-29 Superfortress heavy bomber's based in India hit navy yard and arsenal at Saigon. 1 bombs bridge at Bangkok. Results are poor. 76 B-29 Superfortress heavy bomber's of 73d Bomber Wing are airborne from the Marianas against Musashiho and Nakajima aircraft plants near Tokyo. Clouds and high winds over target area prevent bombing of the primary. 56 very heavy bombers bomb secondary target of Tokyo urban area and 6 others attack alternates and targets. Fighter opposition is the heaviest to date and 5 B-29 Superfortress heavy bomber's are downed. 4 others ditch or crash-land. B-29 Superfortress heavy bomber gunners claim 60 fighters kills, the highest very heavy bomber claim to date.

Seventh Air Force. 19 United States Army Air Force (USAAF) B-24 Liberator heavy bombers, based at Saipan, bomb Iwo Jima. 10 heavy bombers from Saipan and Guam follow up with individual harassment raids against the island during 27-28 January 1945. 1 B-24 Liberator heavy bombers from Angaur bombs Arakabesan.


Liberation of Auschwitz

U.S. #2981e from the “1945: Victory at Last” World War II sheet. Click image to order.

On January 27, 1945, Soviet troops liberated the Auschwitz concentration camp, marking the beginning of the end of the Holocaust.

The Nazis targeted European Jews and other ethnic groups, such as Gypsies, Poles, and Slavs, during World War II. Adolf Hitler considered these groups to be genetically inferior to his “Aryan” master race. Removing the Jews was one of the steps in Hitler’s plan for world domination.

U.S. #2981e – 1995 Liberation First Day Cover. Click image to order.

To facilitate this mass murder the Nazis built concentration camps. At first, these highly organized camps were used to terrorize and intimidate, but in 1941 when Hitler decided to murder all of the Jews, the camps became killing factories. About 2.5 million people were murdered at the concentration camp in Auschwitz, Poland, alone.

U.S. #UX168 – Holocaust Memorial Museum postcard with Silk cachet. Click image to order.

Witold Pilecki was the only person known to voluntarily be imprisoned by the Nazis at Auschwitz Concentration Camp. Pilecki was a Polish cavalry officer who saw heavy fighting at the outset of World War II. When the Soviet Union invaded Poland from the east, the Polish resistance collapsed. Pilecki then helped found the “Secret Polish Army,” an underground resistance unit. As news of the Auschwitz camp surfaced, he volunteered to investigate and allowed himself to be captured.

Israel #220-21 – Israel stamps honoring the survivors and victims of the Holocaust. Click image to order.

For two and a half years Pilecki organized resistance, fed information about the camp to the outside world, and wrote about the details of the camp. Pilecki helped create resistance cells and smuggled information out of the camp. But by 1943, he realized no help was coming. Pilecki decided to escape to give his report in person, and one night he and two other prisoners succeeded. Pilecki’s reports, however, were dismissed as unbelievable exaggerations, and neither the British nor the Russians would help.

Israel #841 – A 1983 souvenir sheet commemorating. Click image to order.

Then in mid-1944, about half of the 130,000 prisoners were moved to other camps. That November, the Soviet Red Army began approaching Auschwitz through Poland. Aware of their impending arrival, the camp’s Nazi organizers quickly began to dismantle the crematoriums and convert them into air raid shelters. They destroyed most written records and other evidence of what had occurred there, including many of the buildings. Another 58,000 Auschwitz detainees were evacuated on January 17.

United Nations #948 – UN stamp honoring International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Click image to order.

Then, on January 27, 1945, the Soviets arrived and liberated the remaining 7,500 prisoners. Though the Nazis had destroyed much of the camp, the liberators were still shocked at what they found there, including the belongings of over a million people. By the end of the war approximately 6 million Jews, about two-thirds of all the Jews in Europe, had been killed by the Nazis. The total number of civilians killed by the Nazis is estimated to be at least 11 million.

Israel #523 was issued for Heroes and Martyrs Day. Click image to order.

Fifty years later, the United Nations named January 27 as “International Holocaust Remembrance Day,” to honor the victims of the Nazi era. Secretary-General Kofi Annan called the Holocaust “a unique evil that cannot simply be consigned to the past and forgotten.”


Liberation of Auschwitz

On January 27, 1945, Soviet troops liberated the Auschwitz concentration camp, marking the beginning of the end of the Holocaust.

The Holocaust targeted European Jews and other ethnic groups, such as Gypsies, Poles, and Slavs, by the Nazis during World War II. Adolf Hitler considered these groups to be genetically inferior to his “Aryan” master race. Removing the Jews was one of the steps in Hitler’s plan for world domination.

To facilitate this mass murder the Nazis built concentration camps. At first these highly organized camps were used to terrorize and intimidate, but in 1941 when Hitler decided to murder all of the Jews, the camps became killing factories. About 2.5 million people were murdered at the concentration camp in Auschwitz, Poland alone.

U.S. #2981e – 1995 Liberation First Day Cover.

Witold Pilecki was the only person known to voluntarily be imprisoned by the Nazis at Auschwitz Concentration Camp. Pilecki was a Polish cavalry officer who saw heavy fighting at the outset of World War II. When the Soviet Union invaded Poland from the east, the Polish resistance collapsed. Pilecki then helped found the “Secret Polish Army,” an underground resistance unit. As news of the Auschwitz camp surfaced, he volunteered to investigate and allowed himself to be captured.

For two and a half years Pilecki organized resistance, fed information about the camp to the outside world, and wrote about the details of the camp. Pilecki helped create resistance cells and smuggled information out of the camp. But by 1943, he realized no help was coming. Pilecki decided to escape to give his report in person, and one night he and two other prisoners succeeded. Pilecki’s reports, however, were dismissed as unbelievable exaggerations, and neither the British nor the Russians would help.

U.S. #UX168 – Holocaust Memorial Museum postcard with Silk cachet.

Then in mid-1944, about half of the 130,000 prisoners were moved to other camps. That November, the Soviet Red Army began approaching Auschwitz through Poland. Aware of their impending arrival, the camp’s Nazi organizers quickly began to dismantle the crematoriums and convert them into air raid shelters. They destroyed most written records and other evidence of what had occurred there, including many of the buildings. Another 58,000 Auschwitz detainees were evacuated on January 17.

United Nations #948 – U.N. stamp honoring International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Then, on January 27, 1945, the Soviets arrived and liberated the remaining 7,500 prisoners. Though the Nazis had destroyed much of the camp, the liberators were still shocked at what they found there, including the belongings of over a million people. By the end of the war approximately 6 million Jews, about two-thirds of all the Jews in Europe, had been killed by the Nazis. Total number of civilians killed by the Nazis is estimated to be at least 11 million.

Item #CNS5525 – Mystic-enhanced coin honoring the liberation of the concentration camps.

Fifty years later, the United Nations named January 27 as “International Holocaust Remembrance Day,” to honor the victims of the Nazi era. Secretary-General Kofi Annan called the Holocaust “a unique evil that cannot simply be consigned to the past and forgotten.”


Birthday numerology calculation for people born on 27th January 1945

  • If your birth date was Jan 27 1945 then your life path number is 11
  • Meaning of this life path number: Individuals with the Life Path number 11 have great intuition. Eleven is actually the most intuitive of all the numbers. You are very sensitive to your surroundings and have an amazing understanding of others. This helps you discover many a things that are going on behind the scenes. Examples of such sensitivity would be being able to sense others relationships or health without knowing them. You can use your strengths to greatly help others. This life path number is called Master Number 11 or 11/2. This number combines all the traits of number 1 twice over, and at the same time includes all the characteristics of highly charged number 2.


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Life in the camps

The prisoners' day began at 4:30 am (an hour later in winter) with morning roll call. Dr. Miklos Nyiszli describes roll call as beginning 3:00 am and lasting four hours. The weather was cold in Auschwitz at that time of day, even in summer. The prisoners were ordered to line up outdoors in rows of five and had to stay there until 7:00 am, when the SS officers arrived. [ 96 ] Meanwhile the guards forced the prisoners to squat for an hour with their hands above their heads or levy punishments such as beatings or detention for infractions such as having a missing button or an improperly cleaned food bowl. The inmates were counted and re-counted. [ 97 ] Nyiszli describes how even the dead had to be present at roll call, standing supported by their fellow inmates until the ordeal was over. When he was a prisoner in 1944󈞙, five to ten men were found dead in the barracks each night. [ 98 ] The prisoners assigned to Mengele's staff slept in a separate barracks and were awoken at 7:00 am for a roll call that only took a few minutes. [ 99 ]

After roll call, the Kommando, or work details, walked to their place of work, five abreast, wearing striped camp fatigues, no underwear, and ill-fitting wooden shoes without socks. [ 100 ] A prisoner's orchestra (such as the Women's Orchestra of Auschwitz) was forced to play cheerful music as the workers left the camp.

Kapos were responsible for the prisoners' behavior while they worked, as was an SS escort. The working day lasted 12 hours during the summer and a little less in the winter. Much of the work took place outdoors at construction sites, gravel pits, and lumber yards. No rest periods were allowed. One prisoner was assigned to the latrines to measure the time the workers took to empty their bladders and bowels. [ 97 ] [ 100 ]

Sunday was not a work day, but the prisoners did not rest they were required to clean the barracks and take their weekly shower. [ 101 ] Prisoners were allowed to write (in German) to their families on Sundays. Inmates who did not speak German would trade some of their bread to another inmate for help composing their letters. Members of the SS censored the outgoing mail. [ 102 ]

A second mandatory roll call took place in the evening. If a prisoner was missing, the others had to remain standing in place until he was either found or the reason for his absence discovered, regardless of the weather conditions, even if it took hours. After roll call, individual and collective punishments were meted out, depending on what had happened during the day, before the prisoners were allowed to retire to their blocks for the night and receive their bread rations and water. Curfew was two or three hours later. The prisoners slept in long rows of wooden bunks, lying in and on their clothes and shoes to prevent them from being stolen. [ 101 ]

According to Nyiszli, "Eight hundred to a thousand people were crammed into the superimposed compartments of each barracks. Unable to stretch out completely, they slept there both lengthwise and crosswise, with one man's feet on another's head, neck, or chest. Stripped of all human dignity, they pushed and shoved and bit and kicked each other in an effort to get a few more inches' space on which to sleep a little more comfortably. For they did not have long to sleep". [ 103 ]

The types of prisoners were distinguishable by triangular pieces of cloth, called Winkel, sewn onto on their jackets below their prisoner number. Political prisoners had a red triangle, Jehovah's Witnesses had purple, criminals had green, and so on. The nationality of the inmate was indicated by a letter stitched onto the Winkel. Jews had a yellow triangle, overlaid by a second Winkel if they also fit into a second category. [ 104 ] Uniquely at Auschwitz, prisoners were tattooed with their prisoner number, on the chest for Soviet prisoners of war and on the left arm for civilians. [ 105 ] [ 106 ]

Prisoners received a hot drink in the morning, but no breakfast, and a thin meatless vegetable soup at noon. In the evening they received a small ration of moldy bread. Most prisoners saved some of the bread for the following morning. [ 107 ] Nyiszli notes the daily intake did not exceed 700 calories, except for prisoners being subjected to live medical experimentation, who were better fed and clothed. [ 108 ] Sanitary arrangements were poor, with inadequate latrines and a lack of fresh water. [ 102 ] In Auschwitz II-Birkenau, latrines were not installed until 1943, two years after camp construction began. [ 27 ] The camps were infested with vermin such as disease-carrying lice, and the inmates suffered and died in epidemics of typhus and other diseases. [ 27 ] Noma, a bacterial infection occurring among the malnourished, was a common cause of death among children in the Gypsy camp. [ 39 ]

Block 11 of Auschwitz I was the prison within the prison, where violators of the numerous rules were punished. Some prisoners were made to spend the nights in standing cells. These cells were about 1.5 m 2 (16 sq ft), and held four men they could do nothing but stand, and were forced during the day to work with the other prisoners. Prisoners sentenced to death for attempting to escape were confined in a dark cell and given neither food nor water until they were dead. [ 109 ]


Shop Talks on Socialism

From The Militant, Vol. IX No.ل, 27 January 1945, p.ل.
Transcribed & marked up by Einde O’ Callaghan for the Encyclopaedia of Trotskyism On-Line (ETOL).

“I don’t care what you say,” Scissorbill Sam (the bosses’ man) was protesting, “You’ve got to have executives.”

“Why of course you have,” said Pop soothingly, “of course you have.”

“Well that screwball Slim says things can run by themselves.”

“Nope, ’taint so,” Pop replied, not making it clear whether he meant it wasn’t so that things could run by themselves, or it wasn’t so that Slim had said they could run by themselves.

Anyway, feeling thus encouraged, Scissorbill Sam got under way. “And even if you had your own executives – Slim was talking about a bunch of two bit bookkeepers – huh! – even so, they’d have to have someone over them, wouldn’t they? Even Eugene Grace has someone over him, hasn’t he?”

“The stockholders!” was the triumphant reply.

“Oh, the thirty-eight million dollar a year boys. Grace is in on that gang as well as being president of the corporation. So he must take orders from himself.”

“Pretty happy accident,” Pop chuckled.

“I mean incidental,” snapped Scissorbill.

“Now don’t get excited. What’s your point?”

“The point is that these engineers or bookkeepers or whatever they are, won’t have anyone to make them toe the line. Who’s going to call them to order, who’s going to fire them?”
 

Who’ll Do All the Firing?

“Well for that matter, who’s going to fire us underthat kind of a set-up? Things’d come to a pretty pass,”said Pop “if there was nobody to fire us.”

“Yes, for that matter, when you come right down to it,”said Scissorbill, looking all around with a challenging look, “whois going to?”

Then he calmed down and was very patient with the fellows. “Whatyou guys don’t understand is that even these big executives,even Eugene Grace himself, has to make out reports for thestockholders. And if they don’t manage the business to show aprofit, the stockholders give them the air.”

“That doesn’t sound too bad,” said Shorty. “Atleast it’s systematic, if it really works that way. But whatI’d like to know is this – if it really is the executivesthat make the business show a profit, and if the stockholders reallydo fire them if they fail, how come the stockholders get thirty eightmillion dollars a year just for firing people? Why CrabappleJennings, over to the main gate, does all the hiring and firing forthis whole plant, and he makes hardly any more than I do.”

“It’s their plant, don’t you understand?”shouted Scissorbill. “They own it – that’swhy they get so much . You’d get it too,” he saidgrudgingly, “if you owned it.”

“Yeah, I’ll buy you a drink when I own it. But thatisn’t the point. You were tryin’ to tell us why you haveto have the owners. Sure they are the owners right now. But supposeall of us here, including Scissorbill and all the other workingpeople, was to be the owners. – Suppose we were just asextravagant as the present incumbents and paid our stooges a half amillion or so a year just like they’re doin’ now –we’d still save the thirty eight million profits, which isn’tpeanuts. But according to Scissorbill, we wouldn’t have senseenough to fire these half a million dollar babies if they acted up.”

“I didn’t say that. But who would you have over themto do the firing? A couple thousand jerks like you couldn’tjust walk up in a body and do it.”

“If a couple thousand jerks like me walked up to EugeneGrace in a body, it’d be lots of fun” mused Shorty. “Herecomes Slim. Hey, Slim, if you get this here Socialism, who’sgoing to make these organizers of industry, the bookkeepers and allthat, toe the line ? Scissorbill was tellin’ us they wouldn’thave anybody to prod them.”

“You mean there wouldn’t be anyone over them with awhip, like the foreman over us?”
 

How We’ll Manage Socialized Industry

“Yeah, I was just coming to that. I was figuring we couldsave a lot of money just to give some guy three or four thousandbucks a year and give him a bull whip. And the only thing he’dever have to do would be crack somebody with it when they got out ofline. That would save us thirty seven million, nine hundred ninetysix thousand dollars. Right?”

“Right,” said Slim solemnly. “But I’mafraid we’d have to spend a little more of our thirty eightmillion than that. In the first place there’d be hell of a lotmore than thirty eight million anyway, but say there was only thatmuch more produced than the wages we’re getting right now, wecouldn’t add all of that onto our wages. We’d have tospend a little making this place a little more decent to work in.We’d get the new wheel on that number two crane right away, forinstance, instead of waiting for the insurance company to make us doit, after somebody got killed.

“As for the guy with the whip. Well, that’s gettingby pretty cheap for us. But it’s too much like capitalism formy taste. We want to produce more than we do today. We’ve gotto have a more efficient system that won’t break down indepressions and bust out into wars. You can’t bring that aboutwith a whip.”

“You mean the capitalists will let us walk in like cowsgoing to clover?” queried Shorty.

“Oh that’s something else again. I’m talkingabout how we’re going to work things – how we’regoing to make production go.”

“We could elect an industrial commission, sort of inspectorson a nationwide scale. Only instead of holding a rule or a pair ofmikes on the margin of a piece of sheet metal, they would have tomeasure up the total production of the whole country. If the steelplants weren’t up to specifications with the auto plants, theguys who were organizing the output of steel would be told about it.”

“There you are,” said Scissorbill. “Thesesuper-inspectors of yours would eat up your thirty eight million.You’d have to give them a damned high wage.”

“I don’t know about that – ” Slim startedto reply.

“Now don’t tell me they’d work for the kind ofmoney you do.”

“Well, the capitalists get their Congressmen to work for ten thousand a year. Thirty eight million dollars would buy thirty eight hundred Congressmen for a year. It ought to buy the services of three or four production experts for the steel industry. If it doesn’t, we’ll train our own experts – send them to a college for expert planners on the understanding that they’d have to work for a measly ten thousand a year when they come out.”


Roosevelt, Brass Hats Speed Forced Labor

From The Militant, Vol. IX No.ل, 27 January 1945, pp.ف &م.
Transcribed & marked up by Einde O’ Callaghan for the Encyclopaedia of Trotskyism On-Line (ETOL).

Responding to the fervent appeals of the labor haters Roosevelt has renewed his demand for legislation conscripting workers for profit. He dispatched a message to the House Military Affairs Committee, urging immediate action on the May-Bailey Bill now before that body. Along with his statement, Roosevelt enclosed a message from the top ranking brass hats, Admiral King and General Marshall.

The Commander-in-Chief and his Chiefs of Staff threw their weight behind the vicious May-Bailey forced labor measure in an effort to head off the growing opposition to labor conscription. Upon receipt of Roosevelt’s communication, Chairman May of the Military Affairs Committee, co-author of the May-Bailey bill, abruptly terminated the hearings and announced: “We’ve discussed this matter long enough. It’s now time to act.”

However, resistance developed to this attempt to railroad the bill through committee and hearings were reopened for further testimony. The technique worked out by the forced labor advocates was to rush the measure through under cover of an emotional barrage laid down by Roosevelt’s “psychological warfare” division. This barrage reached a frenzied peak in the period following the military reversal in Europe.

Rumors were spread of the possibility of buzz-bomb attacks on east coast cities. Race tracks were shut down and conventions banned travel and hotel rooms were rationed rumors were circulated of wholesale shutdowns of all sports, gin mills, night clubs, etc.
 

“Psychological Warfare”

Editorials in the capitalist press shrieked about “our boys” dying because of a shortage of munitions. Hysterical accusations were hurled at workers charged with leaving their war jobs. The impression created was that the workers were retiring to Palm Beach and Miami to attend the races, loll on the warm sand, drink champagne and stroll along the boardwalk with a buxom blonde on each arm.

In commenting on “Washington’s psychological warfare,” the magazine Business Week remarks:

“Responsible officials discount – but do not deplore – such rumors. They regard them as ‘salutary speculation,’ which can be expected to hasten the transfer of workers from civilian to war industry and to create in the civilian mind a general receptivity to any further restrictions which may be necessary.”

No wonder Roosevelt and his henchmen decided that further open hearings on a slave labor act might prove embarrassing!

The arguments advanced by Roosevelt in support of a national service law were riddled to pieces. Testimony before the House Military Affairs Committee proved that there was neither a “munitions” nor a “manpower” shortage. The champions of slave labor were compelled to fall back on their only remaining argument: “The brass hats want it, and if they want it who are we to say no?”

In answering the contention that “workers can produce better under a voluntary program,” a representative of the Chief of Staff replied:

“The present system is itself coercive, but it is not impartial. All this (May-Bailey) bill asks is a legalization of what now is being done administratively, but more universally and hence in a more democratic way.”

It is true that Roosevelt has frozen workers to their jobs at frozen wages by executive decree. The argument is advanced that if the present system of coercion is made “universal” it would thereby become “democratic.”

To the mind of a brass hat, universal coercion and repression equals “democracy.” Therefore, they consider the system of Prussianizing American life under the domination of a military caste as the most “democratic” form of government. In plain language, what Roosevelt and his brass hats are demanding is the “legal” establishment of a military dictatorship. And they want to put it across before the people awaken to their real intentions.
 

Roosevelt’s Haste

This impatience was exhibited in Roosevelt’s letter to the Military Affairs Committee which stated: “While there may be some differences of opinion on the details of the (May-Bailey) bill, prompt action now is much more important in the war effort than the perfecting of details.” Among the “details” which Roosevelt considers so unimportant is one providing that anyone who leaves a job “without permission” shall be “subject on conviction to the penalties provided by the Selective Service Act, which run to $10,000 in fines and five years’ imprisonment” or both. This is just a minor “detail” to labor’s “friend” in the White House.

Committee members said, “they would apply corresponding provisions to those who are directed by their local boards to take essential jobs and fail to do so.” For quitting a job, or failing to take a job when directed to do so, a worker can be fined $10,000 or sent to jail for five years, under the provisions Of the May-Bailey bill. There is another provision prohibiting unions from enforcing closed shop contracts. Still another would bring strikers within the provisions of the measure. But Roosevelt brushes aside these savage penalties and unions wrecking provisions as petty “details” and demands that a forced labor bill be adopted forthwith.

With the exception of the strikebreaking Stalinists, all sections of the labor movement are on record against driving the workers to forced labor for the benefit of the profit-hungry bosses. The union bureaucrats have So far confined their opposition to purely verbal objections voiced by the top leaders. No serious attempt is being made to mobilize the many-millioned ranks of organized labor against the conspiracy to railroad a slave labor bill through Congress.

The union militants must take the lead in making the voice of labor heard in unalterable opposition to any and all forms of forced labor.


Today in World War II History—January 27, 1940 & 1945

Child survivors of Auschwitz, 27 Jan 1945 Still photograph from Soviet film of the liberation of Auschwitz, taken by the film unit of the First Ukrainian Front (public domain via United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Belarussian State Archive of Documentary Film and Photography)

80 Years Ago—January 27, 1940: US freighter City of Flint returns to Baltimore Capt. Joseph Gainard (merchant marine) receives the first Navy Cross of the war. The neutral freighter had been captured by the Germans, creating an international incident: See October 9, 1939 October 23, 1939 November 3, 1939 and November 6, 1939 .

75 Years Ago—Jan. 27, 1945: Soviets liberate Nazi concentration camps of Auschwitz and Birkenau about 7000 prisoners remain.

US Twentieth Bomber Command (B-29s) evacuates from Chengtu, China to Kharagpur, India as Japanese advance in China.


Watch the video: 27th January 1945: Auschwitz-Birkenau liberated by Soviet forces


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