USS Montpelier (CL-57)

USS Montpelier (CL-57)


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USS Montpelier (CL-57)

The USS Montpelier (CL-57) was the third member of the Cleveland class of light cruisers, and won the Navy Unit Commendation and thirteen Battle Stars for her service in the Pacific. She was laid down five months after the Cleveland, launched only three months behind her and commissioned on 9 September 1942.

The Montpelier carried more anti-aircraft guns than the Cleveland or the Columbia, with twenty four 40mm guns (four quadruple mountings and four double mountings) and seventeen 20mm guns in single mountings, up from the eight 40mm and thirteen 20mm guns of the earlier ships.

The Montpelier reached Noumea, in New Caledonia, on 18 January 1943, and was chosen to serve as the flagship of CruDiv 12, part of Rear-Admiral A. S. Merrill's Task Force 68. Her first combat experience came on 29-30 January 1943 during the battle of Rennell Island. This saw the Japanese launch a series of heavy air attacks on the Task Force and the troop convoy they were escorting to Guadalcanal. The Montpelier survived intact, but the heavy cruiser Chicago was lost.

On 21 February the Montpelier helped cover the invasion of the Russell Islands (Operation Cleanslate). On the night of 5-6 March she bombarded the airfield at Vila-Stanmore on Kolombangara, just to the north-west of New Georgia, and took part in the sinking of a Japanese destroyer (action of Kula Gulf). This and the bombardment of Poporang Island (on the night of 29-30 June) were part of the preparations for the invasion of New Geogia (Operation Toenails), which took place on 30 June. The Montpelier remained around New Goergia for the next four months, spending most of her time patrolling around the island, before visiting Sydney for a brief rest.

The Montpelier then joined Task Force 39 (still under Admiral Merrill), and took part in the invasions of the Treasury Islands and Bougainville (Operations Goodtime and Cherryblossom). On 1 November, while Allied troops were landing in Empress Augusta Bay, on the western shores of Bougainville, the Montpelier was part of a force that attacked Japanese positions at Buka and Bonis at the northern tip of the island. The task force then regrouped in the bay, where early on 2 November it fought off an attack by a slightly superior Japanese fleet (battle of Empress Augusta Bay). This was a clear American victory and saw the Japanese lose the light cruise Sendai and a destroyer without sinking any American ships. In addition to taking part in the sinking of one of the Japanese ships the Montpelier's AA gunners shot down five Japanese aircraft.

The Montpelier was part of the naval force that covered the amphibious landings on the Green Islands, in the gap between Bougainville and New Ireland (15-19 February 1944). In the following month she was part of a force that made an anti-shipping sweep in the area between New Ireland and the Japanese base at Truk, before at the end of the month taking part in the invasion of Emirau, to the north-west of New Ireland. From there she moved on to take part in the bombardment of Saipan (14 June), part of the leapfrogging campaign that left Truk isolated to the end of the war. The Japanese responded to the invasion of the Mariana Islands by launched their last major carrier attack of the war (battle of the Philippine Sea, or the Great Marianas Turkey Shoot). The Montpelier was part of Task Force 58 during this battle, which saw the last Japanese carrier air groups almost completely destroyed, ending any chance of a major Japanese naval victory. After the battle the Montpelier bombarded targets on Saipan, Tinian and Guam, before on 2 August leaving to return to the United States for an overhaul.

She didn't return to the Pacific until 25 November, and thus missed the battle of Leyte Gulf. The Montpelier arrived in the gulf just as the kamikaze campaign was getting under way, and shot down four incoming kamikaze aircraft in the area. She then moved on to support the invasion of Mindoro (12 December), the landings in the Lingayen Gulf (January 1945), at Mariveles Harbor, Corregidor and Palawan (February) and Mindanao (April).

She then moved on to take part in the invasion of Borneo, reaching Brunei on 9 June before taking part in the fighting at Balikpapan (from 17 June-2 July), where the Australians had landed to capture the key oil facilities. The Montpelierprovided direct fire support for the troops as well as protecting minesweepers and divers. Like her older sisters Cleveland and Columbia the Montpelier spend the last two months of the war patrolling in the East China Sea as part of the campaign to completely isolate Japan from all sources of war materials.

At the end of the war the Montpelier was stationed at Wakayama, where she took part in the evacuation of Allied prisoners of war. On 18 October she helped cover the arrival of occupation troops at Matsuyama, before in the next month sailed for home. The Montpelier won 13 battle stars for her service during the Second World War. Unlike her older sisters she had a short post-war career, serving with the Atlantic Fleet from 11 December 1944 to June 1945 and the 16th Fleet from 1 July until 24 January 1947 when she was decommissioned and entered the reserve at Philadelphia. She remained in the reserve fleet until 1959, and was sold to be broken up in the following year.

Displacement (standard)

11,744t

Displacement (loaded)

14,131t

Top Speed

32.5kts

Range

11,000nm at 15kts

Armour – belt

3-5in

- armour deck

2in

- bulkheads

5in

- barbettes

6in

- turrets

6.5in face
3in top
3in side
1.5in rear

- conning tower

5in
2.25in roof

Length

610ft 1in oa

Armaments

Twelve 6in/47 guns (four triple turrets)
Twelve 5in/38 guns (six double positions)
Twenty four 40mm guns
Seventeen 20mm guns
Four aircraft

Crew complement

1,285

Builder

New York SB

Laid down

2 December 1940

Launched

12 February 1942

Commissioned

9 September 1942

Broken up

1960


USS Montpelier (CL-57)

USS Montpelier (CL-57) was one of 26 United States Navy Cleveland-class light cruisers completed during or shortly after World War II. She was the second US Navy ship to be named for the city of Montpelier, Vermont. Montpelier was commissioned in September 1942 and saw service in several campaigns in the Pacific. Like almost all her sister ships, she was decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, and never saw active service again. Montpelier was scrapped in the early 1960s.


World War II [ edit ]

Montpelier arrived in Nouméa, New Caledonia on 18 January 1943 from Norfolk, Virginia Rear Admiral A. S. Merrill chose her for the flagship of Cruiser Division 12 (CruDiv 12). On 25 January, she reached Efate, New Hebrides, her home base for the next few months. While making a sweep around beleaguered Guadalcanal, she participated in the Battle of Rennell Island on 29 January, the last naval engagement of the Guadalcanal Campaign. Ώ]

Montpelier covered the landings on the Russell Islands on 21 February. On the night of 5–6 March, she heavily bombarded the Vila‑Stanmore airfield on Kolombangara in the Solomons, and helped sink an enemy destroyer in the Battle of Blackett Strait. She and three other cruisers bombarded Poporang Island (in the Shortland Islands) on the night of 29–30 June, in preparation for the invasion of New Georgia. On the night of 11–12 July, she bombarded fortifications on Munda, enabling troops to continue their conquest of New Georgia. She patrolled the New Georgia area for the next four months to prevent Japanese troop withdrawals. Ώ]

After a voyage to Sydney, Australia, she joined Task Force 39 (TF 39) as its flagship for the invasion of the Treasury and Bougainville Islands. On 1 November, Montpelier shelled the Buka‑Bonis airfields on the northern tip of Bougainville, and hit the Japanese defenses on the islands of Poporang and Balalae, in the Shortlands. TF 39, consisting of cruisers and destroyers, engaged a superior Japanese force in the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay while guarding transports on the night of 2 November. The result was a victory for the U.S. ships commanded by Admiral Merrill. The victory turned back the Japanese from what would have been a disastrous assault on the Bougainville landing forces. Besides assisting in the destruction of one ship, Montpelier ' s gunners shot down five enemy planes. Ώ]

From 15–19 February 1944, Montpelier covered the amphibious landing on the Green Islands in the Bismarck Archipelago. In March, she hunted shipping south of Truk and participated in the invasion of the Emiraus. On 20 May 1944, Montpelier received light damage from return fire when she and two other light cruisers, along with eight destroyers, bombarded shore installations on Shortland, Poporang, and Magusaiai islands in the Shortlands. ΐ] On 1 October 1944, the US Navy's Special Air Task Force (SATFOR), Α] and began shelling Saipan on 14 June to support the Mariana Islands invasion. She joined TF 58 and participated in the decisive Battle of the Philippine Sea from 19–21 June. During the engagement, Japanese carrier air groups were virtually annihilated. Montpelier returned to the Marianas, and continued her shelling of Saipan, Tinian, and Guam. She left the Marianas on 2 August for overhauling in the United States. Ώ]

Returning on 25 November, she joined a task group off Leyte Gulf. While steaming on defensive patrol off the Gulf, Montpelier was slightly damaged by a kamikaze attack on 27 November. ΐ] She fought off numerous other kamikaze attacks, shooting down four planes.

Beginning on 12 December, Montpelier provided beach cover for the invasion of Mindoro. Fighting kamikazes, she protected troops at the Lingayen Gulf landing in January 1945. In February, she supported operations off Mariveles Harbor, Corregidor, and Palawan, and from 14–23 April, she covered the landings on Mindanao. From her base at Subic Bay, she steamed to Brunei Bay, Borneo, arriving on 9 June. From 17 June to 2 July, she sailed off the oil center at Balikpapan, providing support for minesweepers, underwater demolition teams, and amphibious forces. During the latter part of July and early August, Montpelier made three anti-shipping sweeps in the East China Sea as part of Task Force 95. Ώ]

Post-War [ edit ]

When hostilities ended, she anchored off Wakayama, Japan, and helped accelerate the evacuation of Allied prisoners. After an inspection of Japanese ships, part of her crew went ashore to view the ruins of Hiroshima. On 18 October she covered the landing of occupation forces at Matsuyama. Montpelier departed from Hiro Wan and Japanese waters on 15 November for the East Coast, having battled the enemy from their deepest point of advance to their very homeland. Ώ] From the Pacific, Montpelier sailed first for Hawaii, then to San Diego, California, before heading south to pass through the Panama Canal, with her final destination being New York City.

She reported for duty with the Atlantic Fleet on 11 December, and on 1 July 1946 reported for duty with the 16th Fleet. Montpelier decommissioned and berthed in reserve at Philadelphia on 24 January 1947. She was struck from the Naval Register on 1 March 1959, and was sold for scrap to Bethlehem Steel Co. 22 January 1960. Ώ]


Shield of Montpelier

  • The Green Mountains, principal topographical feature of Vermont, for whose capital Montpelier was named.
  • A crowned eagle, replica of the crest of the Empress Augusta, wife of Germany's William I, after which Empress Augusta Bay was named. Montpelier, as Flagship of Task Force 39, played the principal role in the defeat of the Japanese in the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay.
  • On fringe are coral cockershells, representative of the vast expanse of the Pacific, main theater in which Montpelier operated.

USS Montpelier (CL-57) - History

(CL‑57: dp. 10,000 l. 608'4" b. 66' dr. 20' s. 33 k. cpl. 992 a. 12 6", 12 5", 28 40mm., 10 20mm. cl. Cleveland)

The second Montpelier (CL‑57) was laid down 2 December 1940 by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N.J. launched 12 February 1942 sponsored by Mrs. William F. Carry and commissioned 9 September 1942, Capt. Leighton Wood in command.

Montpelier arrived Noumea, New Caledonia, 18 January 1943 from Norfolk, Va. Rear Adm. A. S. Merrill chose her for the flagship of CruDiv 12. On 25 January, she reached Efate, New Herbrides, her home base for the next few months. While making a sweep around beleaguered Guadalcanal, she participated in the Battle of Rennell Island 29 January, the last naval engagement of the Guadalcanal campaign.

Montpelier covered the landings on the Russell Islands on 21 February. On the night of 5 to 6 March, she heavily bombarded the Vila‑Stanmore airfield on Kolombangara in the Solomons, and helped sink an enemy destroyer. She and three other cruisers bombarded Poporang Island on the night of 29‑30 June, in preparation for the invasion of New Georgia. On the night of 11‑12 July, she bombarded Munda, enabling troops to continue their conquest of New Georgia. She patrolled the New Georgia area for the next 4 months to prevent Japanese troop withdrawals.

After a run to Sydney, Australia, she joined TF 39 as its flagship for the invasion of the Treasury Islands and Bougainville. On 1 November Montpelier shelled the Buka‑Bonis airfields on the northern tip of Bougainville, and hit the Japanese defenses on Poporang and Ballale Islands, TF 39, consisting of cruisers and destroyers, engaged a superior Japanese force in the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay while guarding transports on the night of 2 November. The result was a clear cut victory for the U.S. ships commanded by Admiral Merrill. The victory turned back the Japanese from what would have been a disasterous assault on the Bougainville landing forces. Besides assisting in the destruction of one ship, Montpelier gunners shot down five enemy planes.

Between 15 and 19 February 1944, Montpelier covered the amphibious landing on Green in the Bismarcks. In March she hunted shipping south of Truk and participated in the invasion of the Emiraus, and began shelling Saipan 14 June to support the Marianas invasion. She joined TF 58 and participated in the decisive Battle of the Philippine Sea from 19 to 21 June. During the engagement, Japanese carrier air groups were virtually annihilated. Montpelier returned to the Marianas, and continued her shelling of Saipan, Tinian, and Guam. She left the Marianas 2 August for overhauling in the United States.

Returning 25 November, she joined a task group off Leyte Gulf. While steaming on defensive patrol off the gulf, she fought oft numerous kamikaze attacks, shooting down four planes. Beginning 12 December, Montpelier provided beach cover for the invasion of Mindoro. Fighting enemy suicide planes, she protected troops at the Lingayen Gulf landing in January 1945. In February she supported operations off Mariveles Harbor, Corregidor, and Palawan and from 14 April to 23 April, she covered the landings on Mindanao. From her base at Subic Bay she steamed to Brunei Bay, Borneo, arriving 9 June. Between 17 June and 2 July, she sailed off the oil center at Balikpapen, providing support for minesweepers, underwater demolition teams, and amphibious forces. Australian troops were extremely grateful for the devastating shelling of enemy positions, which saved many Allied lives. During the latter part of July and early August, Montpelier made three antishipping sweeps in the East China Sea.

When hostilities ended, she anchored off Wakayama, Japan, and helped speed up the evacuation of Allied prisoners. After an inspection of Japanese ships, part of her crew went ashore to view the ruins of Hiroshima, ultimate reminder of the price of aggression. On 18 October she covered the landing of occupation forces at Matsuyama. Montpelier departed from Hiro Wan and Japanese waters 15 November for the east coast, having fought the enemy from their deepest point of advance to their very homeland.

She reported for duty with the Atlantic Fleet 11 December and 1 July 1946 reported for duty with the 16th Fleet. Montpelier decommissioned and berthed in reserve at Philadelphia 24 January 1947. She was struck from the Naval Register 1 March 1959, and was sold for scrap to Bethlehem Steel Co. 22 January 1960.


World War II [ edit | edit source ]

Montpelier arrived Nouméa, New Caledonia on 18 January 1943 from Norfolk, Va. Rear Admiral A. S. Merrill chose her for the flagship of Cruiser Division 12 (CruDiv 12). On 25 January, she reached Efate, New Hebrides, her home base for the next few months. While making a sweep around beleaguered Guadalcanal, she participated in the Battle of Rennell Island on 29 January, the last naval engagement of the Guadalcanal Campaign.

USS Montpelier before her 1944 refit.

Montpelier covered the landings on the Russell Islands on 21 February. On the night of 5–6 March, she heavily bombarded the Vila‑Stanmore airfield on Kolombangara in the Solomons, and helped sink an enemy destroyer in the battle of Blackett Strait. She and three other cruisers bombarded Poporang Island on the night of 29–30 June, in preparation for the invasion of New Georgia. On the night of 11–12 July, she bombarded Munda, enabling troops to continue their conquest of New Georgia. She patrolled the New Georgia area for the next four months to prevent Japanese troop withdrawals.

After a run to Sydney, Australia, she joined Task Force 39 (TF 39) as its flagship for the invasion of the Treasury and Bougainville Islands. On 1 November, Montpelier shelled the Buka‑Bonis airfields on the northern tip of Bougainville, and hit the Japanese defenses on Poporang and Ballale Islands. TF 39, consisting of cruisers and destroyers, engaged a superior Japanese force in the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay while guarding transports on the night of 2 November. The result was a clear cut victory for the U.S. ships commanded by Admiral Merrill. The victory turned back the Japanese from what would have been a disastrous assault on the Bougainville landing forces. Besides assisting in the destruction of one ship, Montpelier ' s gunners shot down five enemy planes.

From 15–19 February 1944, Montpelier covered the amphibious landing on the Green Islands in the Bismarck Archipelago. In March, she hunted shipping south of Truk and participated in the invasion of the Emiraus, and began shelling Saipan on 14 June to support the Mariana Islands invasion. She joined TF 58 and participated in the decisive Battle of the Philippine Sea from 19–21 June. During the engagement, Japanese carrier air groups were virtually annihilated. Montpelier returned to the Marianas, and continued her shelling of Saipan, Tinian, and Guam. She left the Marianas on 2 August for overhauling in the United States.

Aerial view of the Montpelier in 1945

Montpelier ' s main batteries firing during the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay

Returning on 25 November, she joined a task group off Leyte Gulf. While steaming on defensive patrol off the Gulf, Montpelier was slightly damaged by a kamikaze attack on 27 November. Ώ] She fought off numerous other kamikaze attacks, shooting down four planes.

Beginning on 12 December, Montpelier provided beach cover for the invasion of Mindoro. Fighting kamikazes, she protected troops at the Lingayen Gulf landing in January 1945. In February, she supported operations off Mariveles Harbor, Corregidor, and Palawan, and from 14–23 April, she covered the landings on Mindanao. From her base at Subic Bay, she steamed to Brunei Bay, Borneo, arriving on 9 June. From 17 June to 2 July, she sailed off the oil center at Balikpapan, providing support for minesweepers, underwater demolition teams, and amphibious forces. Australian troops were extremely grateful for the devastating shelling of enemy positions, which saved many Allied lives. During the latter part of July and early August, Montpelier made three anti-shipping sweeps in the East China Sea.

Post-War [ edit | edit source ]

When hostilities ended, she anchored off Wakayama, Japan, and helped speed up the evacuation of Allied prisoners. After an inspection of Japanese ships, part of her crew went ashore to view the ruins of Hiroshima. On 18 October she covered the landing of occupation forces at Matsuyama. Montpelier departed from Hiro Wan and Japanese waters on 15 November for the East Coast, having fought the enemy from their deepest point of advance to their very homeland. From the Pacific, Montpelier sailed first for Hawaii, then to San Diego, California, before heading south to pass through the Panama Canal, with her final destination being New York City.

She reported for duty with the Atlantic Fleet on 11 December, and on 1 July 1946 reported for duty with the 16th Fleet. Montpelier decommissioned and berthed in reserve at Philadelphia on 24 January 1947. She was struck from the Naval Register on 1 March 1959, and was sold for scrap to Bethlehem Steel Co. 22 January 1960.


Cuprins

Montpelier a fost construit la 2 decembrie 1940 de New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, New Jersey lansat la 12 februarie 1942 sponsorizat de dna. Lesley Sayer Corry, soția lui William F. Corry, primarul orașului Montpelier, Vermont și armat la 9 septembrie 1942, cu căpitanul Leighton Wood la comandă. [1]

Al Doilea Război Mondial Modificare

Montpelier a ajuns la Nouméa, Noua Caledonie, la 18 ianuarie 1943, de la Norfolk, Virginia Contraamiraul A.S. Merrill a ales-o pentru a fii nava comandant Diviziei 12 Crucisătoare (CruDiv 12). Pe 25 ianuarie, a ajuns la Efate, New Hebrides, baza ei pentru următoarele luni. În timp ce imprejura Guadalcanal, ea a participat la bătălia din Insula Rennell din 29 ianuarie, ultima angajare navală a Campaniei Guadalcanal . [1]

Montpelier a acoperit debarcările pe Insulele Russell la 21 februarie. În noaptea de 5–6 martie, a bombardat puternic aerodromul Vila ‑ Stanmore de pe Kolombangara în Solomons și a ajutat la scufundarea unui distrugător inamic în bătălia din strâmtoarea Blackett . Ea și alți trei crucișători au bombardat Insula Poporang (în Insulele Shortland ) în noaptea de 29-30 iunie, în pregătirea invaziei Noii Georgie . În noaptea de 11-12 iulie, ea a bombardat fortificații pe Munda, permițând trupelor să continue cucerirea Noii Georgia. Ea a patrulat zona Noii Georgie pentru următoarele patru luni pentru a preveni retragerea trupelor japoneze. [1]

După o călătorie la Sydney, Australia, ea s-a alăturat Task Force 39 (TF 39) ca nava comandant pentru invazia Trezoreriei și Insulelor Bougainville . La 1 noiembrie, Montpelier a bombardat câmpurile aeriene Buka ‑ Bonis de pe vârful nordic din Bougainville și a lovit apărările japoneze pe insulele Poporang și Balalae, în zonele scurte. TF 39, format din crucisatoare usoare și distrugătoare, a angajat o forță japoneză superioară în bătălia împărătesei Golful Augusta,in timp ce păzea transporturile în noaptea de 2 noiembrie. Rezultatul a fost o victorie pentru navele americane comandate de amiralul Merrill. Victoria i-a întors pe japonezi din ceea ce ar fi fost un atac dezastruos asupra forțelor de debarcare din Bougainville. Pe lângă asistarea la distrugerea unuia navei, tunari Montpelier au doborât cinci avioane inamice. [1]

În perioada 15-19 februarie 1944, Montpelier a acoperit debarcarea amfibiilor pe Insulele Verzi din Arhipelagul Bismarck . În martie, a vânat transportul maritim la sud de Truk și a participat la invazia Emiraus . La 20 mai 1944, Montpelier a primit daune ușoare de la focul de întoarcere, când ea și alți doi crucișători ușori, alături de opt distrugătoare, au bombardat instalațiile de mal pe Shortland, Poporang și insulele Magusaiai din Shortlands. [2] La 1 octombrie 1944, Marina USA „Special Air Task Force (SATFOR) [3] , și au început bombardarea insulei Saipan la 14 iunie pentru a sprijini invazia Insulele Mariane. Ea s-a alăturat TF 58 și a participat la bătălia decisivă a Mării Filipine din 19–21 iunie. În timpul luptei, grupurile aeriene japoneze au fost practic anihilate. Montpelier s-a întors la Marianas și și-a continuat bombadarea insulei Saipan, Tinian și Guam . Ea a părăsit Marianele pe 2 august pentru revizuire în Statele Unite . [1]

Revenind la 25 noiembrie, ea s-a alăturat unui grup de sarcini în largul Golfului Leyte . În timp ce folosea perdeaua de fum în patrulă defensivă în largul Golfului, Montpelier a fost ușor deterioratăt de un atac kamikaze in 27 noiembrie. [2] Ea a luptat împotriva a numeroase alte atacuri kamikaze, dărâmând patru avioane.

Începând cu 12 decembrie, Montpelier a oferit acoperire pe plajă pentru invazia din Mindoro . Luptând împotriva kamikazelor, ea a protejat trupele la debarcare în golfului Lingayen în ianuarie 1945. În februarie, a susținut operațiuni în portul Mariveles, Corregidor și Palawan, iar în perioada 14–23 aprilie, a acoperit aterizările de pe Mindanao. De la baza ei din Subic Bay, a plecat cu vaporul spre Golful Brunei, Borneo, ajungând pe 9 iunie. În perioada 17 iunie - 2 iulie, ea a navigat în centrul petrolier de la Balikpapan, oferind sprijin pentru minieri, echipele de demolare subacvatice și forțele amfibiene. În ultima parte a lunii iulie și începutul lunii august, Montpelier a făcut trei patrule anti-transport în Marea Chinei de Est, ca parte a Task Force 95 . [1]

După Război Modificare

Când ostilitățile s-au încheiat, ea s-a ancorat la Wakayama, Japonia și a ajutat la accelerarea evacuării prizonierilor aliați . După o inspecție a navelor japoneze, o parte din echipajul ei s-a dus pe uscat pentru a vedea ruinele din Hiroshima . Pe 18 octombrie, ea a acoperit debarcarea forțelor de ocupație la Matsuyama . Montpelier a plecat din Hiro Wan și din apele japoneze la 15 noiembrie spre Coasta de Est, luptându-se cu inamicul din punctul lor cel mai profund de înaintare până în patria lor. [1] Din Pacific, Montpelier a navigat mai întâi spre Hawaii, apoi spre San Diego, California, înainte de a se îndrepta spre sud pentru a trece prin Canalul Panama, destinația ei finală fiind New York City .

Ea a raportat pentru serviciu cu Flota Atlanticului la 11 decembrie, iar la 1 iulie 1946 a raportat pentru serviciu cu Flota 16 . Montpelier a fost dezafectat și accesat în rezervă la Philadelphia la 24 ianuarie 1947. A fost sters din Registrul Naval la 1 martie 1959 și a fost vândută pentru resturi către Bethlehem Steel Co. 22 ianuarie 1960. [1]

Montpelier a primit 13 stele de luptă pentru serviciul din Al Doilea Război Mondial, [1] , precum și panglica de la Comandarea Unității Marinei pentru eroism remarcabil în acțiune împotriva navelor de luptă japoneze inamice în noaptea de 1-2 noiembrie 1943, bătălia împărătesei Augusta Bay, ca membru al Cruiser Division Twelve.


USS Montpelier CL-57 Cruise Book - 1942-1945

The cruise book of the USS Montpelier CL-57 summarizes the Pacific War activities of the Cleveland Class Cruiser from 1942 through 1945.

This cruise book summarizes the activities of the USS Montpelier, CL-57, during the time the Cleveland Class Cruiser served in the Pacific War. The book has been reproduced from an original distributed to crew members after the end of the war. This original belonged to Buss Kerstetter, a Firecontrolman FCO3c, who served aboard the USS Montpelier from May 1943 through October 1945.

These pages are free for web viewing. To see more details, use your web browser to zoom in on the images. Original books, plus copies on CD and DVD, are available from vendors on the web.

After the end of the Pacific War, the USS Montpelier went to Wakaura Bay south of Wakayama City, Japan. At Wakayama City Buss went ashore to help repatriate Allied POWs. When told they already had enough volunteers, he and four friends walked into Wakayama City, where they found a likable people who worked hard, built modern cities and warmly welcomed them. See our photos of Wakayama City today.


USS Montpelier (CL 57)

Decommissioned 24 January 1947.
Stricken 1 March 1959.
Sold 22 January 1960 to be broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS Montpelier (CL 57)

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CommanderFromTo
1Capt. Leighton Wood, USN9 Sep 19426 Sep 1943 (+)
2T/Capt. Paul Brogden Koonce, USN6 Sep 194315 Sep 1943
3Capt. Robert Gibson Tobin, USN15 Sep 19432 Dec 1943
4Capt. Harry Draper Hoffman, USN2 Dec 19433 Mar 1945
5T/Capt. William Andrew Gorry, USN3 Mar 194519 Sep 1946

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USS Montpelier (CL-57) - History

USS Montpelier , a 10,000-ton Cleveland class light cruiser, was built at Camden, New Jersey. She was commissioned in September 1942 and, after shakedown and training in the western Atlantic area, arrived in the South Pacific in January 1943. Late in that month, while involved in the last phases of the Guadalcanal Campaign, she participated in the air-sea Battle of Rennell Island. As the Allies began to move up the Solomon Islands chain, Montpelier supported the occupation of the Russell Islands in February 1943, bombarded the Japanese airfield at Vila, Kolombangara, on 5-6 March, and covered the New Georgia invasion during the following summer. In early November 1943 she shelled enemy positions during landings on Bougainville and engaged Japanese warships in the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay.

During the first months of 1944 Montpelier participated in operations to seize bases in the Bismarck and Admiralty Islands. She used her guns to support the invasion of Saipan in June, then took part in the Battle of the Philippine Sea and in the subsequent conquests of Tinian and Guam. Following a shipyard overhaul at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, the cruiser returned to the Western Pacific in November 1944. In the last month of that year and first six months of 1945 she covered landings on Mindoro, Luzon, Corregidor, Palawan, Mindanao and Borneo. In July and August, Montpelier steamed in the East China Sea, hunting for enemy shipping. After Japan capitulated in mid-August, she supported the recovery of Allied Prisoners of War and the occupation of Japan.

Montpelier went home to the United States in late 1945. In January 1947, following brief service with the Atlantic Fleet, she was decommissioned at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she was part of the Reserve Fleet for more than a decade. USS Montpelier was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in March 1959 and sold for scrapping in January 1960.

This page features nearly all the views we have related to USS Montpelier (CL-57).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photographed circa early December 1942, probably in the vicinity of the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 91KB 740 x 575 pixels

Photographed by the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, probably in the Delaware River or Delaware Bay on 12 December 1942.
Note the seaplane floats on her catapults.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 146KB 740 x 585 pixels

Enters Havannah Harbor, Efate, New Hebrides, as seen from USS Columbia (CL-56) on 22 April 1943.
Note the Curtiss SOC "Seagull" floatplane in the right foreground, and the worn paintwork on Montpelier 's hull, forward and amidships, with apparently fresh paint further aft.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 102KB 740 x 620 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

En route from the Marshall Islands to take part in the invasion of Saipan, 11 June 1944.
Photographed from USS Gambier Bay (CVE-73).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 112KB 740 x 620 pixels

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, following overhaul, 18 October 1944.
Her camouflage scheme is Measure 32, Design 11a.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 79KB 740 x 610 pixels

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, following overhaul, 18 October 1944.
Her camouflage scheme is Measure 32, Design 11a.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 70KB 740 x 610 pixels

At the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, at the end of an overhaul, 21 October 1944.
The ship in the background, with weathered Measure 32, Design 7d camouflage, is USS Indianapolis , which had recently arrived at the Navy Yard for overhaul.
Circles mark recent alterations to Montpelier .

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 139KB 610 x 765 pixels

Action in Kula Gulf, 6 March 1943

USS Denver (CL-58) SG radarscope image, showing the situation at time 0117, as the U.S. force begins to turn north after firing on the Japanese destroyers Murasame and Minegumo .
Denver is the bright spot in the center of the scope, with USS Cleveland (CL-55) and USS Montpelier (CL-57) ahead of her, still heading SSW. USS Conway (DD-507) and USS Waller (DD-466) are further ahead, starting to turn north. Kolombangara is the large white patch at left, with one of the Japanese ships showing as a faint spot offshore in the upper left center. Arundel Island is in the lower left and New Georgia is on the right.
Both Japanese destroyers were sunk in this engagement.

Copied from a photograph in Denver 's 9 March 1943 Action Report, 1985

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 53KB 600 x 725 pixels

Navy Unit Commendation letter

Signed by Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal, circa 1944. It commends Cruiser Division Twelve and the crews of the division's cruisers -- USS Cleveland (CL-55), USS Columbia (CL-56), USS Montpelier (CL-57) and USS Denver (CL-58) -- for their performance in the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay, on 2 November 1943.

Courtesy of John R. Henry, 1973.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 111KB 530 x 765 pixels

Rear Admiral Aaron S. Merrill, USN

Receives the Navy Cross medal from Vice Admiral Aubrey W. Fitch, in ceremonies held on the after deck of USS Montpelier (CL-57), 11 December 1943.
Probably taken in Tulagi Harbor, Solomon Islands.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 110KB 740 x 510 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Rear Admiral Aaron S. Merrill, USN (left)

Working with a maneuvering board on USS Montpelier (CL-57), during operations in the Solomon Islands, 23 December 1943. Captain W.D. Brown is also present.
Note the binoculars worn by both officers.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 93KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Launching, at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation shipyard, Camden, New Jersey, 12 February 1942.

Courtesy of James Russell, 1972.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 115KB 595 x 765 pixels

In addition to the images presented above, the National Archives appears to hold other views of USS Montpelier (CL-57). The following list features some of these images:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


Watch the video: Azur Lane - I Married My USS Montpelier


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