General George M Randall AP-115 - History

General George M Randall AP-115 - History


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General George M. Randall

George Morton Randall, born 8 October 1841 at Conneaut, Ohio, enlisted as a private in the 4th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry in the fall of 1861. He served in New York and Washington, and in the field with the Army of Potomac. Breveted Captain for gallant service in the Battle of Antietam he was Breveted Lieutenant Colonel, then Colonel for gallantry in the attack on Fort Stedman. VA. After fighting Indians on the southwestern frontier, he served with the Big Horn, Yellowstone, and Powder expeditions against Indians in the Rockies. General Randall subsequently was on duty at New York and Knoxville, Tenn. prior to commanding the Department of Luzon in the Philippines from 1903 to 1905. After further duty at St. Louis, General Randall retired 8 October 1905 and died 14 June 1918 at Denver, Colo.

(AP-115 dp 11,828 (It.), 1. 622'7", b. 75'6"; dr. 25'6";
s. 20.6 k.; cpl. 507; trp. 5,289; a. 4 5", 16 1.1", 20 20mm.;
cl. General John Pope; T. P2-S2-R2)

General George M. Randall (AP-115) was launched 30 January 1944 under a Maritime Commission contract by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J.; sponsored by Mrs. Robert A. Lovell, wife of the Assistant Secretary of War for Air acquired and simultaneously commissioned 15 April 1914, Capt. Carl C. von Paulsen, USCG, in command.

General George 111. Randall sailed from Norfolk 23 May 1944 with nearly 5,000 troops and casuals and put in at Bombay, India, 5 July via Panama and Australia. Underway again 6 days later, she returned to San Pedro, Calif., 12 August to debark over 2,000 wounded veterans. She made two more round-trip voyages from San Pedro to Bombay from 30 August 1944 to 28 February 1945.

Following a round-trip voyage from San Francisco to Ulithi and back, the ship stood out under the Golden Gate 8 June 1945 for Norfolk, arriving 20 June. She sailed from that port for Marseilles 8 July. There she embarked troops for redeployment in the Pacific theater, and offloaded them at Manila before mooring at San Pedro, Calif., 21 September after the war's end.

As part of the "Magic-Carpet" fleet, General George Randall made six voyages from San Francisco and San Diego to the Far East, calling at Japan, China, Okinawa and the Philippines. She sailed from Pearl Harbor 1 December 1946 for the east coast, and, after undergoing peacetime alterations at Philadelphia, stood out of that port 2 April 1947. Reaching San Francisco 2b April, the transport began a series of shuttle runs between West Coast ports and the Far East, completing six voyages to Guam, two to China and Japan, and two to Hawaii before she was assigned to MSTS in October 1949.

As an MSTS ship General George Randall made scheduled runs between the West Coast and the Orient until fighting erupted in Korea in the summer of 1950. She participated in the amphibious assault at Inchon which routed the North Korean Army and forced Communist evacuation of South Korea. After hordes of Chinese Communist troops poured into Korea and trapped American forces, she served in the evacuation of Hungnam, which saved the embattled G.I.'s enabling them to return to the fight. She moored at New York 26 May 1951, and made four voyages from New York to Bremerhaven and Southampton before returning to Yokohama 24 October 1951 via San Francisco

For the next 3 years this far-ranging ship transported men and equipment across the Pacific between West Coast ports and Japan, Okinava, and Formosa. In 1955 she shifted operations to the East Coast, arriving New York 8 April 1955 for shuttle runs from New York to Bremerhaven, insuring the continuous flow of troops, dependents and supplies to American forces in Europe. During first 3 months of 1957 she cruised the Caribbean, calling at Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Jamaica before resuming her North Atlantic transport runs out of New York 15 April.

These varied duties were highlighted by General George M. Randall's role in the 1958 Lebanon crises. Embarking 1,255 troops of the 35th Tank Battalion at Bremerhaven, and 1,001 other at La Pallice, France, she put them ashore at Beirut, Lebanon, the morning of 3 August 1958, helping to stabilize that strategic country in this swift follow up by sea of the 6th Fleet's powerful and effective action with carrier planes, surface Warship,s, and amphibious landing of marines. (General George M. Randall then returned to New York, arriving 10 August.

Returning to her New York-Bremerton schedule, General George M. Randall visited Spain, Turkey, Greece, and Italy in 1959, and called at ports in Iceland and the Caribbean Islands during the next year as well. On her last voyage, she cast off from Rota, Spain, and moored at New York 13 May 1961. General George H. Randall steamed thence to Bayonne, N.J., where she decommissioned 2 June 1961; she was towed to Norfolk 12 June to join the Maritime Administration National Defense Reserve Fleet 16 August, and is now berthed on James River, VA.


Randall enlisted as a private in the 4th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry in the April 1861. He then accepted appointment to the 4th U.S. Infantry as second lieutenant in October. He served in New York and Washington, D.C., and in the field with the Army of the Potomac. He was a second lieutenant at the Siege of Yorktown, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Battle of Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run (where he commanded Company C), and Fredericksburg and a first lieutenant at the Battle of the Wilderness. He was appointed a brevet captain for gallant service in the Battle of Antietam. He served as a major in the 14th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment, part of Major General Ambrose Burnside's IX Corps on the Richmond-Petersburg Front in 1864, and was commander of the regiment at the Battle of the Crater. The Dansville Advertiser reported on 7 September that he assumed command of the regiment on 18 August. This article also reports that he was wounded in the battle on 19 August. He was appointed a brevet lieutenant colonel, and then colonel for gallantry in the Battle of Fort Stedman. He mustered out of the Volunteer service on 26 August, and was appointed captain in the 4th US Infantry on 23 September 1865. Subsequently, he served at Davids' Island Military Reservation, New York Harbor, where he was in December 1867.

He was assigned to the 23rd Infantry on 31 December 1870, and served with them in the West for more than 20 years. In 1873 he served under General George Crook in Arizona during the Tonto Basin campaign. On March 27, 1873, he led a small force that attacked a group of Yavapai Indians in the Battle of Turret Peak.

On April 25, he led a force that surrounded the camp of Tonto Apache chief Delshay on upper Canyon Creek. Delshay surrendered when the troops started firing, the last of the Apache war chiefs to surrender and move to a reservation.

He also served with General Crook in the 1876 Powder River Expedition during the Black Hills War. From 1879 to 1880, Randall commanded Fort Reno in Oklahoma. He was promoted to major on 15 January 1891, and returned to the 4th Infantry Regiment. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the 8th Infantry on 1 March 1894, then colonel of the 17th US Infantry in the Spanish–American War on 8 August 1898. A month later he transferred back to the 8th US Infantry.

In January 1900, in response to large numbers of immigrants flooding into the Alaskan Territory in search of gold, President William McKinley assigned Randall, now a colonel, to command an army division there. He received commission as brigadier general of Volunteers on 20 January 1900. He was the first commander of Fort St. Michael, and submitted a recommendation calling for a telegraph line between the various Alaskan posts. He was appointed brigadier general, USA, on 6 February 1901. In his Annual Report for the Department of Alaska, he noted that "the Eskimo has been unnoticed by those he has befriended and has been allowed to die for the lack of proper care and food." He later served at New York and Knoxville, Tennessee, and commanded at Vancouver, Washington, prior to commanding the Department of Luzon in the Philippines from 1903 to 1905. After further duty in St. Louis, Missouri, General Randall retired on 8 October 1905, and died on 14 June 1918 in Denver, Colorado. He is buried in the Oak Hill Cemetery in Janesville, Rock County, Wisconsin (Block 20, lot 9, grave 6).

During his long service, he was awarded six brevets: captain (17 September 1862) for Antietam major (2 April 1865) for Petersburg lieutenant colonel and colonel of Volunteers (26 March 1865) for the attack on Fort Stedman lieutenant colonel (27 February 1890) for actions against Indians at Turret Mountain, Arizona on 27 March 1873 and Diamond Butte, Arizona, on 22 April 1873 and colonel (27 February 1890) for "action against Indians near Pinal, Arizona 8 March 1874" and "distinguished service during the campaign against Indians in Arizona.

USS General George M. Randall (AP-115) was named for him. He is also a Prominent Companion of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States.

General Randall is not to be confused with the Rt. Rev. George Maxwell Randall (1810–1873), Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Colorado, one of the founders of the Colorado School of Mines.


Behind AotW

Officers of the US Regular Army units present on the Maryland Campaign of 1862 have a staunch advocate in one of our loyal readers. He has been poking me to make up for obvious deficiencies in my understanding of those present, as seen in the Antietam on the Web database.


Officers of the 14th US Inf. camp near Alexandria, Va., March 1862 (USAMHI, T. Reese)

In addition to providing additional details for some of the officers we do cover on AotW, he’s also challenged me to add a number of men not yet listed. I fear I am not doing this fast enough to suit, but have had a rewarding weekend doing further research on the Regulars at Antietam and these new candidates of interest …

First, I got into Tim Reese’s work on the Regular Infantry in the Eastern Theater – Sykes’ Regular Infantry Division. Tim has done immense pick-and-shovel work on these men and their units, and put it all together in highly readable style. As a result, his book is the seminal single volume resource on the subject.

I also walked through the order of battle on AotW to be sure we’ve adequately represented each of the US Infantry Units. I found I’d not connected small detachments of the 8th and 19th US Infantry to the 12th and 17th regiments, respectively, so I caught those up.

There were US Regular Army officers in commands all across the Army of Potomac, of course, including many in State volunteer units. And the Regular artillery batteries were also distributed among the Volunteers.

The United States Infantry units, though, were all assigned together in the 1st and 2nd Brigades of George Sykes’ 2nd Division, General Fitz John Porter’s Fifth Army Corps. At Antietam these troops were positioned at the center of the Federal battle line, and advanced toward Sharpsburg over Antietam Creek by the Middle Bridge in support of General Pleasonton’s Horse Artillery on September 17th [map]. There’s a great “what-if” story to be found in that action, by the way.

There are dozens of company grade Regular Officers who served under Sykes at Antietam and deserve my attention and a place on the website. I hope I will get to all of them eventually, but will do quick sketches here for eight we have before us, by request of our loyal reader:


William H. Powell (post-War from Powell’s Officers via Reese)

William Henry Powell (1838-1901). 2nd Lieutenant, 4th US Infantry. He was Acting Assistant Adjutant General (AAAG) of the First Brigade, Sykes’ Division at Antietam. Born in Washington DC about 1838, he enlisted as Private in the 4th Battalion, DC Militia on 17 April 1861, and was discharged 17 July. He was appointed 2nd Lieutenant in the 4th US Infantry 24 Oct 1861, and promoted to 1st Lieutenant on the day before the battle of Antietam. He served as Adjutant of the 4th Infantry 1 Mar 1862 to 29 Jan 1863. He won brevets to Captain (Antietam) and Major (Petersburg) for War service.

During the rest of his long military career he was made Captain 2 Feb 1865, Major of the 22nd Infantry 5 Aug 1888, Lieutenant Colonel of the 11th Infantry 4 May 1892, and finally, Colonel commanding the 9th US Infantry 27 June 1897. He retired from the Army 25 Apr 1899, and died 16 Nov 1901 at home in Sacketts Harbor, NY at age 63. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Powell is perhaps best known today as the prolific chronicler of the 4th Infantry, the V Corps of the Army of the Potomac, and other Army history.

William Falck (1837-1909). Sergeant Major, 2nd US Infantry. Born in Berlin, he was 25 in 1862. He spent two years in England, then emigrated to the US in 1858. He had served in the 2nd Infantry from June of that year as Private and Corporal in Company F, then Sergeant Major of the regiment until 3 Oct 1862. He was then appointed 2nd Lieutenant (probably for performance at Antietam) to date from 18 July 1862. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on 9 Feb 1863. He was assigned as Adjutant from November 1863 – November 1864.

He was seriously wounded at Spottsylvania, Virginia, in May 1864, and spent part of his recovery on duty at the POW camp at Elmira, New York, where he met his future wife [history]. He was recognized for War service by brevets to Captain, Major, and Lieutenant Colonel for actions at Richmond, Chancellorsville, and Spottsylvania Courthouse.

Falck continued in the Army after the War, being promoted Captain on 18 April 1866, and he married Miss Mary B. McQuhae of Elmira in June 1867. He retired from the Army in 1883 “for disabilities incurred in the service”, and afterward had a successful business career including the position of treasurer and general manager of the LaFrance (now part of American-LaFrance) fire engine company. He died at home in Elmira in 1909.


Evan Miles (c. 1877, USNPS, from Powell, Officers … who served)

Evan Miles (1838-1908). 1st Lieutenant, 12th US Infantry. Probably with Company E, 2nd Battalion of the 12th at Antietam. Born in McVeytown, New York, he accepted appointment as 1st Lieutenant, 12th US Infantry on 5 Aug 1861. He served as Regimental Quartermaster 19 Nov 1863 to 20 Jan 1865, and was promoted to Captain on 20 Jan 1865.

He transferred to the new 21st US Infantry 21 Sept 1866 at it’s formation [history], served with them on Reconstruction duty in Virginia, and in 1869 went West – to Arizona by way of San Fransisco – in command of Company E. He was cited by brevet for action against the Nez Perces in 1877 (Clearwater, Idaho) and Piutes (or Pi Utes, Umatilla Agency, Oregon) in 1878 [book excerpt].

He was appointed Major of the 25th Infantry – the famed “Buffalo Soldiers” [photo] – on 24 Apr 1888, promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the 20th Infantry 25 Apr 1892, transferred to the 22nd in September 1895 and, finally, the First Infantry in November. He was made Colonel of that regiment on 4 May 1897. During the Spanish-American War he was appointed Brigadier General of Volunteers (6 Oct 1898 – 10 Jan 1899). He retired from active duty after nearly 38 years of service on 19 July 1899. He died in San Francisco, California, 24 May 1908.

Guido Ilges (c. 1835-). Captain, 14th US Infantry. He commanded Company E, 1st Battalion of the 14th at Antietam. Born in Prussia, he was about 27 in 1862. He was appointed Captain in the 14th Infantry on 14 May 1861, very near the start of the War, and served at that rank for its duration. He was cited by brevets to Major and Lieutenant Colonel for gallant service in action at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, Virginia.

He continued his career in the Army after the War, largely in the West, including commands at Forts Laramie [park], Benton, and Keogh. He was promoted to Major in the 7th US Infantry 10 Dec 1873. He transferred to the 6th Infantry in December 1879, and was appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the 18th US on 6 Feb 1882. However, he was convicted of “duplicating accounts” – padding his expenses – by a court martial in July 1883, and dismissed from the service, his sentence confirmed by President Chester Arthur 12 October 1883 [NYTimes].

William Lucius Kellogg (1841-1897). 2nd Lieutenant, 10th US Infantry. He commanded Company I of the 10th, which was attached to the 2nd Infantry under 1st Lieutenant John S. Poland at Antietam. He was born in Ohio, and was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant in the 10th Infantry 5 Aug 1861. He saw action in Company command on the Peninsula earlier in 1862, and was slightly wounded during the Seven Days. After Antietam he was assigned to the Brigade Staff, and was promoted to 1st Lieutenant (Co. B, 13 Mar 1863). He was detached on recruiting duty from September 1863 through February 1865, having been made Captain 1 Jan 1864. He was recognized for “gallant and meritorious service” at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg by brevets to 1st Lieutenant, Captain and Major by war’s end.

Another long-career soldier, he was appointed Major of the 19th US Infantry 15 Sept 1884 after almost 20 years’ post-War service. He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel of the 5th US 14 July 1890, and Colonel of the Regiment on 30 Jan 1895. He died on 17 Apr 1897, and is buried in the Oakdale Cemetery, Jefferson, Ohio.

Edward Pennington Pearson, Jr. (1837-1915). 1st Lieutenant, 17th US Infantry. He commanded Company E, 1st Battalion of the 17th at Antietam. Born in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, he was a civil engineer in Reading at the outbreak of War. He enlisted in the Ringgold Artillery and was in Washington in April 1861 as one of the First Defenders. In May he was appointed Adjutant of the 25th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, but soon accepted appointment as 1st Lieutenant in the 17th US, to date from 14 May 1861. Some time after Antietam he was promoted to Captain, to date from 16 Aug 1862.

He served in the Division of Regular Infantry, Fifth Army Corps, at the siege of Yorktown, battles of Gaines Mill, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, Antietam and Fredericksburg. He was on the staff of Major General Howard, commanding Eleventh Army Corps, at the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg transferred with Howard’s Army Corps to the Army of the Cumberland, and was present at the battles of Wauhatchie, Chattanooga, and the various actions and skirmishes of the Atlanta campaign, having his horse shot under him at the battle of Jonesboro when Atlanta was captured. When General Howard was promoted to command the Army of the Tennessee, he asked for the transfer of Pearson, who, as his staff officer, accompanied the right wing on General Sherman’s march to the sea, and participated in the battle of Bentonsville, N.C. (Who’s Who in Pennsylvania, 1904)

He was honored during the War by brevet to Major (3 May 1863) and Lieutenant Colonel (1 Sept 1864) for gallant and meritorious service at Chancellorsville and during the Atlanta Campaign, respectively.

He continued in the Army with the 17th Infantry after the War, serving in Texas, the Dakota and Montana Territories, and finally made Major – of the 21st US Infantry – 19 May 1881. He saw service in the 21st in Idaho, Oregon, Nebraska and Wyoming. He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel, 24th Infantry on 19 Apr 1886, and Colonel of the 10th US 14 Oct 1891 – both regiments also serving in the West.

The announcement of the engagement and approaching marriage of Colonel Edward P. Pearson, Tenth infantry, to Miss [Maud] Eskridge [1871-1917], daughter of Major [Richard Isaac] Eskridge, of the same regiment, was quite a surprise to the colonel’s many friends in this city, but congratulations are in order and these and best wishes for the future are hereby sent Colonel Pearson at Fort Reno, by his many well wishers in this city. (Santa Fe New Mexican, 9 April 1898)

He led the 3rd Brigade, V Corps at San Juan Hill on 1 Jul 1898 in the War with Spain and was rewarded with a commission as Brigadier General of Volunteers (12 July 1898 – 30 Nov 1898). He retired on 16 May 1899, after battling malaria in Cuba. He and his wife were buried in the Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery, Point Loma, San Diego County, California in 1915 and 1917.

William Scott Worth (1840-1904). 1st Lieutenant, 8th US Infantry. Born in Albany, New York, he had been running a silver mine in New Mexico since 1859. He came east to Washington, and was appointed 2nd Lieutenant, 8th US Infantry on 26 Apr 1861, and 1st Lieutenant on 7 June 1861. He was Adjutant from 5 Sept 1861 to 13 Apr 1862. He was on the staff of Brigadier General Henry Hunt (AoP Chief of Artillery) from the Summer of 1862, including at Gettysburg, and was with General George Meade and the Army of the Potomac through to 1865. Worth had orders to an appointment as ADC to MGen Hooker June 1863 – just as that officer was being relieved of command of he AoP. He received brevets during the War to Captain (1 Aug 1864) for the “assault on the enemy’s lines before Petersburg and in the operations in the campaign against Richmond, Va” and Major (9 Apr 1865) for “gallant and meritorious service during the campaign terminating with the surrender of the insurgent army under Gen RE Lee”.

After the War he remained in the Army, being promoted to Captain in the 8th Infantry 14 Jan 1866. In 1869 the 8th Infantry was consolidated with the 1st Battalion, 17th US into the 23rd Infantry. He served in the West, from Arizona to Oregon, over the 25 years until his next promotion, to Major in the Second Infantry on 9 Mar 1891. He was Lieutenant Colonel of the 13th US Infantry (26 Nov 1894) and led the 2nd Brigade, V Corps briefly til wounded on San Juan Hill (1 Jul 1898) [news story, pdf]. He was then appointed Colonel of the 16th Infantry (11 Aug 1898). Concurrently, he held a commission as Brigadier General of Volunteers (12 July 1898 – 30 Oct 1898), then on 29 Oct 1898 he was promoted to Brigadier General, USA. He retired at that rank on 9 Nov 1898. He died at his nephew’s house on Staten Island 16 Oct 1904.

Worth’s famous father William Jenkins Worth had fought in 1812, against the Seminoles, and in Mexico Ft. Worth, Texas and Lake Worth, Florida were named for him. The younger Worth’s birth name was reportedly Winfield Scott Worth, but his father’s falling out with the old General in 1848 apparently led him to change it.


George M. Randall (USAMHI, via 4thuscok.org)

George Morton Randall (1841-1918). 2nd Lieutenant, 4th US Infantry. He was in command of Company C of the 4th at Antietam. Ohio-born, he enlisted and served as a Private in the 4th Pennsylvania Infantry April – July 1861, then accepted appointment as 2nd Lieutenant in he 4th US Infantry in October. He was made 1st Lieutenant after Antietam, in November 1862. He took a commission as Major (16 Aug 1864) in the 14th New York Heavy Artillery, and was made Lieutenant Colonel at Wars’ end (1 June 1865). He mustered out of the Volunteer service 26 August, and was appointed Captain in the 4th US Infantry on 23 Sept 1865.

He was assigned to the 23rd Infantry 31 Dec 1870, and served with them in the West for more than 20 years until he was promoted to Major 15 Jan 1891 and returned in that rank to the 4th Infantry. He had commanded the Indian Scouts under Brigadier General George Crook in the Yellowstone and Big Horn Expeditions of 1876. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the 8th Infantry 1 Mar 1894, then Colonel of the 17th US in the Spanish-American War (8 Aug 1898). A month later he transferred back to the 8th US. He had a commission as Brigadier General of Volunteers (4 May 1898 – 12 Apr 1899, 20 Jan 1900) and served in command of the Department of Alaska. He was appointed Brigadier General, USA on 6 Feb 1901. He had stateside duty including command at Vancouver, Washington, then completed his career in command of the Department of Luzon in the Philippines from 1903-1905. He retired on 8 October 1905.

During his long service he was awarded six brevets: Captain (17 Sept 1862) for Antietam, Major (2 Apr 1865) for Petersburg, Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel of Volunteers (26 Mar 1865) for the attack on Ft Stedman, Lieutenant Colonel (27 Feb 1890) for actions against Indians at Turret Mountain, Arizona 27 Mar 1873 and Diamond Butte, Arizona 22 Apr 1873, and Colonel (27 Feb 1890) for “action against Indians near Pinal, Arizona 8 Mar 1874” and “distinguished service during the campaign against Indians in Arizona in 1874”.

He died 14 Jun 1918, in Denver, Colorado, and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Janesville (Rock County), Wisconsin. The USS General George M. Randall (AP-115), in service from 1944-62, was named in his honor. [images, history].
____________

Mr. Reese’s book is:
Reese, Timothy J., Sykes’ Regular Infantry Division, 1861-1864: A History of Regular United States Infantry Operations in the Civil War’s Eastern Theater, Jefferson (NC): McFarland&Company, Inc., 1990

The photo at the top of this post is from that volume, page 72. Tim’s caption says of it:

Officers of the 14th US Inf, camp near Alexandria, Va., March 1862, prior to embarking for the Peninsula (from left to right): Maj. Grotius R. Giddings, Capt. W. Harvey Brown, Capt. John D. “Paddy” O’Connell, Lt. Daniel M. Broadhead, Capt. William R. Smedberg, Lt. David Krause, Lt. Cornelius L. King (note the sash over his shoulder signifying he was officer of the day), Lt. George K. Brady, Capt. Guido Ilges, Lt. Alonso J. Bellows, Lt. James Henton, Lt. John H. Walker, Lt. Patrick Collins, Lt, John McClintock, officer with crossed arms is unidentified, Lt. Daniel Loosely, Lt. James F. McElhone, Capt. Hamlin W. Keyes, Capt. Jonathan B. Hager, Capt. John McNaught (aka McIntosh). (USAMHI, MOLLUS Collec.)

The basics for each of these officer’s service are from Heitman’s indespensible Register:

Heitman, Francis Bernard, Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army 1789-1903, Washington DC: US Government Printing Office, 1903 (Also available online from GoogleBooks online)

Powell’s best known volumes are:

Powell, William Henry, Powell’s Records of Living Officers of the United States Army, Philadelphia: R. L. Hamersly, 1890 [online]

Powell, William Henry and Edward Shippen, editors, Officers of the Army and Navy (regular) who Served in the Civil War, Philadelphia: L.R. Hamersly & Co., 1892

Powell, William Henry, The Fifth Army Corps (Army of the Potomac): A Record of Operations During the Civil War in the United States of America, 1861-1865, New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1896 [online]

Powell, William Henry (compiler), List of Officers of the Army of the United States from 1779 to 1900, Embracing a Register of All Appointments by the President of the United States in the Volunteer Service During the Civil War, and of Volunteer Officers in the Service of the United States: June 1, 1900, Philadelphia: L. R. Hamersly & Co., 1900 [online]

Falck: Genealogical and family history of central New York : a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation (1912), pp. 1251-1252 [online]

Pearson: Hamersly, Lewis R., editor, Who’s Who in Pennsylvania, New York: L.R. Hamersly Company, 1904. [bio online]

Worth: Obituary, New York Times, Monday October 17, 1904, Page 9 [online, pdf]

5 Responses to “US Regular Infantry in Maryland, 1862”

Very nicely done, Brian. And just for the record, it wasn’t me chirping about Regulars this time! 8^)

Thank you Tom and Don. And quite right, Don, this project was at the prodding of another student of the US Regulars.

Tim Reese’s book also provides the names of the other 80 or so officers in command of Regular Infantry companies at Antietam. These all need representation on AotW. So clearly there’s no bottom in sight …

My name is Brandon Samuels and I really like some of the posts you have on your blog. The information you provide is great and really interesting. Since you have an interest in blogging, I thought that you might want to know about a new web site, timelines.com. The idea is to create an interactive historical record of anything and everything, based on specific events that combine to form timelines. We’re trying to achieve a sort of user-created multimedia history, in which no event is too big or too small to record. Feel free to create events using excerpts and/or links from your blog. You will generate traffic and awareness of your blog, and you will be contributing to the recording of history.

With your interest in the American Civil War, you should check out this timeline. So far it is a work in progress and we would definitely love for more people to contribute. http://timelines.com/topics/american-civil-war/page/1.

Give us a try and let me know your thoughts.
Thanks,
Brandon Samuels
[email protected]

Thanks for this site and info.
In picture I see Lieut. McElhone who wrote reference for my great grandfather James Cameron at Maryland camp, Oct. 1861 (“in every respect a good soldier”).
Both wounded at Gaines’ Mill.


Alaska and the Philippines [ edit | edit source ]

In January 1900, in response to large numbers of immigrants flooding into the Alaskan Territory in search of gold, President William McKinley assigned Randall, now a colonel, to command an army division there. He received commission as Brigadier General of Volunteers on 20 January 1900. He was the first commander of Fort St. Michael, and submitted a recommendation calling for a telegraph line between the various Alaskan posts. He was appointed Brigadier General, USA, on 6 February 1901. In his Annual Report for the Department of Alaska, he noted that "the Eskimo has been unnoticed by those he has befriended and has been allowed to die for the lack of proper care and food." He later served at New York and Knoxville, Tennessee, and commanded at Vancouver, Washington, prior to commanding the Department of Luzon in the Philippines from 1903 to 1905. After further duty in St. Louis, Missouri, General Randall retired on 8 October 1905, and died on 14 June 1918 in Denver, Colorado. He is buried in the Oak Hill Cemetery in Janesville, Rock County, Wisconsin (Block 20, lot 9, grave 6).

During his long service, he was awarded six brevets: Captain (17 September 1862) for Antietam Major (2 April 1865) for Petersburg Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel of Volunteers (26 March 1865) for the attack on Fort Stedman Lieutenant Colonel (27 February 1890) for actions against Indians at Turret Mountain, Arizona on 27 March 1873 and Diamond Butte, Arizona, on 22 April 1873 and Colonel (27 February 1890) for "action against Indians near Pinal, Arizona 8 March 1874" and "distinguished service during the campaign against Indians in Arizona.


Peacetime duties

She sailed from Pearl Harbor on 1 December 1946 for the east coast and after undergoing peacetime alterations at Philadelphia (including the removal of her armament), stood out of that port on 2 April 1947. Sailing through the Panama Canal again and reaching San Francisco on 25 April, the transport began a series of shuttle runs between West Coast ports and the Far East, completing six voyages to Guam, two to China and Japan, and two to Hawaii before she was assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service (now the Military Sealift Command) in October 1949.


General George M Randall AP-115 - History

Ted graduated in the June, 1949 North High class. He enlisted in the US Marine Corps on July 5, 1949 in Des Moines, IA. His service number was 1100567. Ted's next of kin was listed as Mrs. Eva May Morlan Hatfield, 516 12th Street, Des Moines, IA.

**USS General George M. Randall (AP-115)
Korean War
As an MSTS ship, USS General George M. Randall made scheduled runs between the West coast of the United States and the Orient until fighting erupted in Korea in the summer of 1950. She participated in the amphibious assault at Inchon which routed the North Korean Army and forced Communist evacuation of South Korea. After hordes of Chinese Communist troops poured into Korea and trapped American forces, she served in the evacuation of Hungnam, which saved the embattled G.I.'s enabling them to return to the fight.

She moored at New York, New York, on 26 May 1951, and made four voyages from New York to Bremerhaven and Southampton before returning to the Pacific. On 11 March 1951, General George M. Randall departed Yokohama, Japan, with the bodies of 52 men, the first Korean War dead to be returned to the United States, including Major General Bryant E. Moore, who had commanded the IX Corps. Armed Services honor guards were in attendance at the departure, as was an Army Band, and was heavily covered by the press. The ship arrived at San Francisco, also carrying 1500 officers and men of the 1st Marine Division being rotated home for 30 day leave. She then returned to Yokohama on 24 October.

***1st Marine Division
(From the 1st Marine Division Presidential Unit Citation Award)
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting The Presidential Unit Citation to the First Marine Division Reinforced for services as set forth in the following citation:
"For extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the periods 21 to 26 April, 16 May to 30 June, and 11 to 25 September, 1951. Spearheading the first counteroffensive in the spring of 1951, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, engaged the enemy in the mountainous center of Korea in a brilliant series of actions unparalleled in the history of the Marine Corps, destroying and routing hostile forces with an unrelenting drive of seventy miles north from Wonju. During the period 21 to 26 April, the full force of the enemy counteroffensive was met by the Division, north of the Hwachon Reservoir. Although major units flanking The Marine Division were destroyed or driven back by the force of this attack, the Division held firm against the attackers, repelling the onslaught from three directions and preventing the encirclement of the key center of the lines. Following a rapid regrouping of friendly forces in close contact with the enemy, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, was committed into the flanks of the massive enemy penetration and, from 16 May to 30 June, was locked in violent and crucial battle which resulted in the enemy being driven back to the north with disastrous losses to his forces in the number of killed, wounded, and captured. Carrying out a series of devastating assaults, the Division succeeded in reducing the enemy's main fortified complex dominating the 38th Parallel."

(From the 1st Marine Division Presidential Unit Citation Award)
The President of the Republic of Korea takes profound pleasure in citing for outstanding and superior performance of duty during the period 26 October to 27 July 1953 the First United States Marine Division Reinforced for the award of President Unit Citation:
"Landing at Wonsan on 26 October 1950 the First United States Marine Division (Reinforced) advanced to Yudam-ni where they engaged the Chinese Communist Forces. The heroic and courageous fighting of the First United States Marine Division (Reinforced), which was outnumbered but never outfought by the Chinese Communist Forces coupled with its fight against the terrible winter weather in this return to Hungnam, has added another glorious page to the brilliant history of the United States Marines. After regrouping and retraining, the First United States Marine Division (Reinforced) rejoined the United Nations Forces and began the attack to the north which drove the aggressors relentlessly before them. The enemy spring offensive during April 1951 which threatened to nullify the recent United Nations gains was successfully repulsed by the First Marine Division (Reinforced) and when other Republic of Korea Forces were heavily pressed and fighting for survival the timely offensive by this Division gave heart to the people of Korea."


General George M Randall AP-115 - History

Source: Troopships of World War II by Roland W. Charles, published by the Army Transportation Association, Washington, D.C., 1947

Troop ships for which additional information is available on this website

Other troop ships

A. P. HILL
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ALEDA E. LUTZ
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ANDES
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ANTIOCH VICTORY
AQUITANIA
ARAWA
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ARGENTINA
ARLINGTON
ARROW
ARTHUR C. ELY
ASA GRAY
ATHLONE CASTLE
ATHOS II
AZALEA CITY

BARANOF
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BELLE ISLE
BENJAMIN CONTEE
BENJAMIN GOODHUE
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DOROTHEA L. DIX
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DULUTH

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EDWARD RUTLEDGE
ELBRIDGE GERRY
ELEAZAR WHEELOCK
ELGIN VICTORY
ELI D. HOYLE
ELIHU YALE
ELIZABETH C. STANTON
EMMA WILLARD
EMILY H. M. WEDER
EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA
EMPRESS OF SCOTLAND
ERNEST HINDS (HOSP.)
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ERNESTINE KORANDA
ERNIE PYLE
ESEK HOPKINS
ESPERANCE BAY
ETHAN ALLEN
ETOLIN
EUFAULA VICTORY
EUGENE HALE
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EXCELLER
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EXCHANGE
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EZRA CORNELL

F. A. C. MUHLENBERG
F. J. LUCKENBACH
F. MARION CRAWFORD
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FREDERICK FUNSTON
FREDERICK LYKES
FREDERICK VICTORY
FROSTBURG VICTOY

GATUN
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GENERAL A. W. BREWSTER
GENERAL A. W. GREELY
GENERAL C. C. BALLOU
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GENERAL C. H. MUIR
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GENERAL E. T. COLLINS
GENERAL G. M. RANDALL
GENERAL G. O. SQUIER
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GENERAL H. F. HODGES
GENERAL H. L. SCOTT
GENERAL H. W. BUTNER
GENERAL HARRY TAYLOR
GENERAL J. C. BRECKINRIDGE
GENERAL J. H. McRAE
GENERAL J. R. BROOKE
GENERAL JOHN POPE
GENERAL LeROY ELTINGE
GENERAL M. B. STEWART
GENERAL M. C. MEIGS
GENERAL M. L. HERSEY
GENERAL M. M. PATRICK
GENERAL O. H. ERNST
GENERAL OMAR BUNDY
GENERAL R. E. CALLAN
GENERAL R. L. HOWZE
GENERAL R. M. BLATCHFORD
GENERAL S. D. STURGIS
GENERAL STUART HEINTZELMAN
GENERAL T. H. BLISS
GENERAL W. A. MANN
GENERAL W. C. GORGAS
GENERAL W. C. LANGFITT
GENERAL W. F. HASE
GENERAL W. G. HAAN
GENERAL W. H. GORDON
GENERAL W. M. BLACK
GENERAL W. P. RICHARDSON
GENERAL WILLIAM MITCHELL
GENERAL WILIAM WEIGEL
GEORGE B. McCLELLAN
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JOSEPH HEWES
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JOSEPH LEIDY
JOSEPH N. TEAL
JOSEPH T. DICKMAN
JOSEPH T. ROBINSON
JOSEPH WARREN
JOSHUA HENDY
JOSHUA SENEY
JOSIAH BARTLETT
JOSIAH D. WHITNEY
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JUSTIN S. MORRILL

KEMP P. BATTLE
KING S. WOOLSEY
KINGS POINT VICTORY
KINGSTON VICTORY
KLIPFONTEIN
KOKOMO VICTORY
KOTA AGOENG
KOTA BAROE
KOTA INTEN

LACONIA VICTORY
LA CROSSE VICTORY
LA GRANDE VICTORY
LAKE CHARLES VICTORY
LAMBERT CADWALADER
LARGS BAY
LARKSPUR
LA SALLE
LEHIGH VICTORY
LEJEUNE
LELAND STANFORD
LEONARD WOOD
LEVI WOODBURY
LEW WALLACE
LEWISTON VICTORY
LINCOLN STEFFENS
LINCOLN VICTORY
LINDLEY M. GARRISON
LOCK KNOT
LOUIS A. MILNE
LOUIS McLANE
LOUISA M. ALCOTT
LUCRETIA MOTT
LURLINE
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LYMAN ABBOTT
LYON

M. I. T. VICTORY
M. M. GUHIN
MADAWASKA VICTORY
MADISON
MADISON J. MANCHESTER
MAHANOY CITY VICTORY
MAJ. GEN. H. A. DARGUE
MAJ. GFN. ROBERT OLDS
MAJ. GEN. W. R. WEAVER
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MARION McK. BOVARD
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MARSHALL ELLIOTT
MARSHALL VICTORY
MARVIN L. THOMAS
MARYMAR
MARYVlLLE VICTORY
MATAROA
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MAUl
MAURETANIA
MAYO BROTHERS
MEDINA VICTORY
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MIRABEAU B. LAMAR
MONTCLAIR VICTORY
MONTEREY (LARGE)
MONTEREY (SMALL)
MONTICELLO
MORETON BAY
MORMACDOVE
MORMACHAWK
MORMACMOON
MORMACPORT
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MORMACWREN
MOSES AUSTIN
MOUNT VERNON
MUHLENBERG VICTORY

N. Y. U. VICTORY
NATHANIEL J. WYETH
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NEW BERN VICTORY
NEWTON D. BAKER
NEVADAN (Two Listings)
NICHOLAS GILMAN
NIEUW AMSTERDAM
NOAH WEBSTER
NOORDAM
NORTH COAST
NORWAY VICTORY

OCEAN MAlL
OCTORARA
ONEIDA VICTORY
ORDUNA
ORION
ORIZABA
OTSEGO

PACHAUG VICTORY
PAINE WINGATE
PASTEUR
PAUL HAMILTON
PENNANT
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PETER J. McGUIRE
PETER MINUIT
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PRESIDENT FILLMORE
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PUEBLA

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REVERDY JOHNSON
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STIRLING CASTLE
STORM KING
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TABINTA
TABITHA BROWN
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TRISTRAM DALTON
TUFTS VICTORY
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U. S. GRANT
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USSR VICTORY

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WATERBURY VICTORY
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WESTBROOK VICTORY
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WESTMINISTER VICTORY
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WILLIAM T. BARRY
WILLIAMS VICTORY
WILSON VICTORY
WINCHESTER VICTORY
WINGED ARROW
WISTERIA
WOODBRIDGE VICTORY
WOOSTER VICTORY

YARMOUTH
YOUNG AMERICA
YUKON

ZANESVILLE VICTORY
ZEBULON B. VANCE
ZEBULON PIKE
ZOELLA LYKES
ZONA GALE


Criza Libanului

Aceste îndatoriri variate au fost evidențiate de rolul generalului George M. Randall în criza libaneză din 1958 . Îmbarcând 1.255 de militari ai Batalionului 35 de tancuri de la Bremerhaven, și alți 1.001 la La Pallice , Franța, i-a pus pe tărâm la Beirut, Liban , în dimineața zilei de 3 august 1958, ajutând la stabilizarea țării în această urmărire rapidă pe mare de pe 6 Acțiunea flotei cu avioane de transport aerian, nave de război de suprafață și aterizare amfibie a marinelor din Statele Unite. Generalul George M. Randall s-a întors apoi la New York, ajungând acolo la 16 august.

Revenind la programul ei din New York-Bremerhaven, generalul George M. Randall a vizitat Spania, Turcia, Grecia și Italia în 1959 și a chemat în porturile din Islanda și Insulele Caraibelor și în anul următor.


General George M Randall AP-115 - History

This USS General George M. Randall AP-115 License Plate Frame is proudly made in the USA at our facilities in Scottsboro, Alabama. Each of our MilitaryBest U.S. Navy Frames feature top and bottom Poly Coated Aluminum strips that are printed using sublimation which gives these quality automobile military frames a beautiful high gloss finish.

Please check your state and local regulations for compatibility of these Navy Frames for use on your vehicle.

A percentage of the sale of each MilitaryBest item is forwarded to the licensing departments of each respective branch of service in support of the MWR (Morale, Welfare, & Recreation) program. These payments are made by either ALL4U LLC or the wholesaler from where the item originated. Our team thanks you for your service and your support of these programs.

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Rosters Of The New York Volunteers During The Civil War

These rosters were compiled by the New York State Adjutant General Office. They were published as a set of 43 volumes between 1893 and 1905. Their official titles are Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York for the Year . : Registers of the [units numbers]. These should not be confused with the regular reports put out by the New York Adjutant General during the same period.

These rosters were digitized by the New York State Library. For a complete list of the documents the library has digitized see www.nysl.nysed.gov/scandocs/

Directory is Government Collections / New York State Government Documents / Executive Agencies / Division of Military and Naval Affairs / Annual report of the Adjutant-General

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