CVE-119 U.S.S. Point Cruz - History

CVE-119 U.S.S. Point Cruz - History


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Point Cruz

(CVE-119: dp. 24,560 (f); 1. 557'1"; b. 75'; ew. 105'2"; dr.
33'; B. 19 k.; cpl. 1,060; a. 2 5", 36 40mm;
el. Commencement Bay)

Point Cruz, an escort carrier named Trocadero Bay until 5 June 1944, was laid down 4 December 1944 by Todd Pacific Shipyard Ineorporated, Tacoma, Wash.; launched 18 May 1945; sponsored by Mrs. Earl R. DeLong; and commissioned 16 October 1945, captain D. T. Day in command.

Following aceeptanee and shakedown, she conducted pilot qualifieations off the West Coast from October 1945 to March 1946. Thereafter she ferried aircraft to forward bases in WestPac. She entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard 3 March 1947 for inactivation, decommissioned 30 June 1947 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet, Bremerton, Wash.

After the start of hostilities in Korea the ship was activated and recommissioned 26 July 1951, CaDtain Horace Butterfield in command. Point Cruz departed CONUS 4 January 1953 after coastal operations and an extensive overhaul modifying her for use as an ASW Hunter-Killer Group carrier.

Based at Sasebo, Japan, Point Cruz patroled the Korean coast in the spring of 1953. After the armistice, her heliocopter squadron took part in "Operation Platform", airlifting Indian troops to the Panmunjom buffer zone to supervise the POW exchange.

The CVE returned to San Diego in late December 1953 and after training and additional overhaul deployed to WestPac again 24 August 1955. While in the Pacific operating with the 7th Fleet, she served as flagship of Carrier Division 15. Point Cruz departed Yokosuka 31 January 1956 and arrived Long Beach in early February for inaetivatiOn at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. Deeommussioned 31 August 1956 CVE-ll9 was placed in the Bremerton Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet. While in a reserve status, she was redesignated AKV-19, 17 May 1957.

Point Cruz was reactivated 23 August 1965 and placed under the operational control of MSTS as T-A}LV-Ig in September 1965. Since commencing service as an aircraft ferry for MSTS, Point Cruz has provided vital logistical support for American forces in South East Asia.


Operational history

Following acceptance and shakedown, she conducted pilot qualifications off the West Coast from October 1945 to March 1946. Thereafter she ferried aircraft to forward bases in WestPac. (Captain Donald S. McMahan took command 27 November 1947, serving until 22 April 1947 when he was replaced by Commander William A. Smyth.) She entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard on 3 March 1947 for inactivation was decommissioned on 30 June 1947 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet, Bremerton, Washington.

After the start of hostilities in Korea the ship was activated and recommissioned on 26 July 1951, with Captain Horace Butterfield in command. (He was replaced by Captain J.W. Davidson in December 1951, and Captain C.C. Marcy became commanding officer in November, 1951.) Point Cruz departed Bremerton on 4 January 1953 after coastal operations and an extensive overhaul modifying her for use as an anti-submarine warfare Hunter-Killer Group carrier. During the transit to San Diego, Point Cruz was damaged in a severe Pacific storm and repairs required several months.

Based at Sasebo, Japan, Point Cruz patrolled the Korean coast in the spring of 1953.(Captain John T. Hayward took command in July 1953.) After the armistice, she served as base for a helicopter squadron that took part in "Operation Platform", airlifting Indian troops to the Panmunjom buffer zone to supervise the prisoner of war exchange. (The incident on which the television movie "1,000 Men and a Baby" took place during Operation Platform.)

The CVE returned to San Diego in late December 1953, and after training and additional overhaul deployed to WestPac again on April 1954, under the command of Captain John T. Hayward. Captain Frederick J. Brush assumed command of the ship in May 1954. In the Far East the carrier served as command ship for Carrier Division 17 under Rear Admiral James S. Russell.

The ship returned to San Diego in November 1954, and deployed again on 24 August 1955 (shortly after Captain Brush was relieved by Captain A.R. Matter) .While in the Pacific operating with the 7th Fleet, she served as flagship of Carrier Division 15. Point Cruz departed Yokosuka on 31 January 1956 and arrived at Long Beach, California, in early February for inactivation at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. Decommissioned on 31 August 1956, CVE-119 was placed in the Bremerton Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet. While in a reserve status, she was redesignated an aircraft transport, AKV-19, on 17 May 1957.

Point Cruz was reactivated on 23 August 1965 and placed under the operational control of the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) as USNS Point Cruz (T-AKV-19) in September 1965. Commencing service as an aircraft ferry for MSTS, Point Cruz provided logistical support for American forces in South East Asia.


A River Ran Through It

In the beginning, before there was a Rio Nuevo, before there was even a Tucson, there was the river.

Rising up in the Santa Rita Mountains south of Tucson, and curving briefly into Mexico, the Santa Cruz River meanders some 222 miles, passing north through Tucson before disappearing in the Sonoran desert on its way to the Gila River.

It's the city's reason for being.

"The mission was here because the Indians were here, and the Indians were here because the river was here," says Julia Fonseca, a Pima County hydrologist.

Thousands of years of history are embedded in the Santa Cruz's now-dry riverbed. Its waters nourished corn on the floodplain below A Mountain as early as 3,500 years ago, and subsequent waves of Hohokam, Pimas and Spaniards thrived here. The river gave the Spanish entrée into Arizona, and a riparian ribbon that connected their missions from northern Sonora to Tumacacori, and up through San Xavier to San Agustín del Tucson, west of what's now downtown.

In the 19th century, Mexicans, Anglos and Chinese continued using the waters of the Santa Cruz to irrigate crops, and even as late as the mid-20th century, Fonseca says, fish still swam in the river's watery remnants. She tallies up the fish species that once lived in its low waters: Gila top minnow, pupfish, Sonora sucker, desert sucker, long-fin dace, Gila chub.

"It was not that long ago, the 40s, that we saw the last of the fish," she says.

These days, it's hard to imagine the river as a lifeline for fish or any other species, including homo sapiens. The Santa Cruz runs north through the 21st-century city like a desiccated scar, its eroded banks replaced with an ugly construction material called soil-cement. Water runs in this glorified drainage ditch only when torrential rains fall, and marring the former waterway is discarded trash, a shopping cart here, a dead cat there.

Yet the abused Santa Cruz is the artery that courses through the heart of the Rio Nuevo development planned for the base of A Mountain and downtown. The massive project's name, "New River" in English, is a linguistic riff that's either ironic or optimistic, depending on your point of view. But there indeed are plans afoot to do something about the authentic rio viejo.

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Rio Nuevo's complex of museums, its hotel and entertainment district, and its restoration of the historic Convento mission residence and Indian archaeological ruins have attracted the most attention. But the river is on the Rio Nuevo agenda, too. Outlined in a master plan the City Council approved unanimously April 9, the development will lie, more or less, on the east and the west banks of the river.

In between, the Santa Cruz, if not exactly resurrected as a naturally flowing river, will be resuscitated as a "ribbon of green." The ugly concrete walls will be banished, replaced by terraces and trees. The river waters won't quite run as they once did, but they'll be evoked periodically through captured rainwater and treated sewer water.

"We propose a riverwalk and a cienega (marsh)," says John Jones, the city's point man for Rio Nuevo. "We want to create an environmentally friendly habitat .

"We want to figure out a way to have a green river channel, with grasses to line the channel bottom and shrubs. We're talking about harvesting rain water, and ponding it."

Rio Nuevo's disputed price tag has now hit the $757 million mark. Jones contends that the number has not soared from the $360 million in public and private funds city voters OK'd in a November 1999 vote. He accounts for the higher figure by saying that planners subsequently lumped various other projects, including the Southern Pacific Depot, under the Rio Nuevo umbrella.

In any case, about $35 million of the Rio Nuevo cash will go to re-green the Santa Cruz. About $5 million would come from tax increment funding, the state sales-tax kickback that underpins the whole project. The city would contribute $5 million in matching funds, while Jones hopes to attract another $5 million in "philanthropic" money or grants. The plan lists $20 million in public funds for "reclaimed water infrastructure."

Another river rehabilitation project, the lyrically named Paseo de las Iglesias ("Trail of the Churches"), would overlap with Rio Nuevo. A joint undertaking of Pima County and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Paseo would green the river between the San Xavier Mission and its vanished visita, or chapel outpost, at San Agustín on the west bank of the Rio Nuevo district. The city, Jones says, is "eager to participate" in the Paseo effort.

A citizen's group called the Santa Cruz River Alliance for two years has been pitching its dreams of a river returned to some semblance of watery life. In late March, the Alliance helped conduct a public conference on the Santa Cruz, promoting their idea that the river could once again be a community asset. The organization even rounded up old-timers to reminiscence about their childhood splashes in a flowing Santa Cruz.

A steadily expanding assault on the Santa Cruz that began when Europeans arrived finally claimed the last vestiges of the river in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

"Tucson has turned its back on the river," declares the Rio Nuevo master plan, produced by Hunter Interests, Maryland-based consultants hired by the city. The planners propose making the Santa Cruz once again the "heart of the city." Their drawings picture verdant riverbanks full of towering cottonwoods, and their written document rhapsodizes like a romantic poet over the possibilities of water, of trees and of wildlife.

"Restored river terraces, islands and sand bars, and new weirs and ponds to slow and collect reclaimed water ensure a healthy ecosystem and wildlife habitat through the core of downtown Tucson," the report reads.

"Small cottonwoods can be planted among the islands and bars, providing habitat for the wildlife that in turn contributes to pollination and seed dispersal. Larger cottonwoods, willows, Arizona ash and other riparian trees and shrubs can be placed on the river's terraced banks to help seed the river bed and to provide year-round habitat for wildlife."


IF THE MASTER PLANNERS' WATERY paradise sounds impossible or even unethical in a desert city, think again. Today's Tucson--city of cracked riverbeds, bastion of eroded banks, domain of denuded floodplains--is a Tucson less than 100 years old. Its desecrated ecosystem is a human-created disaster of epic proportions, bearing almost no relation to the riparian oasis of old.

Even the circumspect Jones says that humans have inflicted "100 years of abuse to the Santa Cruz River."

For millennia, reliable year-round springs bubbled up at San Xavier and at A Mountain, though the river sometimes grew marshy in between. Cottonwood trees lined the stream, and mesquite bosques hugged its banks. The shallow bed was on the same level as the surrounding floodplain. During the monsoon season its waters gently and safely flowed out over floodplain fields today's river rages treacherously through its incised ditch during heavy rains. A rich collection of wildlife--from wolves to coyotes to turkeys--thrived on its shores, and there were even sightings of beaver along its tributary, the Rillito.

A spectacular mesquite forest, four or five miles wide, survived into the 1940s on the now barren Tohono O'odham land in the San Xavier District. Ornithologist Herbert Brandt measured the trees in the 1930s, recording girths up to 13 feet and heights up to 72 feet. These centuries-old colossi were home to legions of birds, among them the now-endangered cactus ferruginous pygmy owl.

"A woodland of giant mesquite trees . drew to itself such a fine list of unusual birds that I feel it merits designation as a separate type of desert area," Brandt reported. The forest had died off by the early 1950s, the last survivor of an ancient riparian wilderness.


IN JULY OF 1855, A GERMAN traveler by the name of Julius Froebel camped along the Santa Cruz a few miles south of what is now downtown Tucson. The little village of some 250 souls had recently passed from Mexican to U.S. hands. The U.S. had won Arizona north of the Gila River (along with much of the rest of the Southwest) after defeating Mexico in a war in 1848. The U.S. bought the remainder of the future state from Mexico in the Gadsden Purchase of 1854.

Froebel, like many early travelers, faithfully recorded the beauties of the land.

"We encamped a few miles above the town, in a pleasant part of the valley," he wrote. "A rapid brook, clear as crystal, and full of aquatic plants, fish and tortoises of various kinds, flowed through a small meadow covered with shrubs . The sides of the hill were so covered with cactus-columns that it might have been called a Saguarro [sic]-forest."

Froebel was not the first English-speaker to sing the praises of the river valley. In 1849, a horde of 49ers pouring through the valley on their way to California recorded their impressions in diaries and letters. They marveled at the abundance of the wildlife not a few mentioned wild turkeys at Tubac another feasted on pronghorn near San Xavier. The river waters kept them alive the lush grasses fed their burros. George Evans, a native of Ohio, came into the upper Santa Cruz in August of that year and declared it the most beautiful valley he had ever seen. "All kinds of wood grows on the hillsides and fine towering cottonwoods mark the course of this river," he wrote.

The U.S. government sent out surveyors, and they too issued enthusiastic reports. In 1852, surveyor John Bartlett headed south from the Gila, through Tucson and down toward Nogales.

"The valley continued a half mile wide, thickly covered with mesquit [sic] trees of a large size," Bartlett wrote. "The bottom-lands resembled meadows, being covered with luxuriant grasses and but few trees. The immediate banks of the river, which is here as diminutive as near Tucson, are lined with cotton-wood trees of a gigantic size . In some places there are large groves of these trees, rendering this part of the valley the most picturesque and beautiful we had seen."

J. Ross Browne, author of the book Adventures in the Apache Country, came through in 1864. He dismissed Tucson as "a city of mud-boxes, dingy and dilapidated, cracked and baked into a composite of dust and filth."

But its natural setting was something else again. He found the river valley south of town "one of the richest and most beautiful grazing and agricultural regions I have ever seen. Occasionally the river sinks, but even at these points the grass is abundant and luxurious . Mesquit [sic] and cottonwood are abundant and there is no lack of water most of the way to (Mexico)."


WHAT HAPPENED TO THIS desert oasis? Historians and hydrologists don't necessarily see eye to eye on which depredations had the worst effects but they agree on culprits of greater and lesser guilt. Grazing, mining and farming all helped suck the river dry. When 19th-century Anglo settlers built dams and ditches to serve these economic interests, they tore out its banks and turned it into a deep, dry channel.

"Over the last 200 years, but mostly in the last 100, human activity has caused the riverbed to incise over 20 feet and widen to more than 1,000 feet in some places," according to the exhibition text for a new show at the Arizona Historical Society Museum, Life of the Santa Cruz River. "What was once a perennial stream is now a yawning, sandy gap that flows only in response to large storms."

As early as 1691, the peripatetic missionary Father Kino noted that "the Indians were alarmed because the Padres pastured so many cattle that the watering places were drying up." But the Indians could not have foreseen that astonishing numbers of cattle would be brought in three centuries later. After Arizona became U.S. Territory, the new railroad brought in so many cattle that by 1885, Pima County alone was home to some 10,000 head, every one of them hungry and thirsty.

Their owners, newcomers to the region, "didn't know about deserts, they didn't understand its cycles," says Barbara Tellman, a researcher at the University of Arizona's Water Resources Research Center and a member of the Santa Cruz River Alliance. Tellman has co-authored two histories of the river. The ranchers didn't expect the five-year drought that hit in the late 1880s, she says, nor the "the big rains that came in the 1890s. There were major floods."

Already damaged by overgrazing, the topsoil washed out in the big inundation. And the lush grasslands, so often praised by the 19th-century travelers, never recovered.

In the city proper, where humans for centuries had shared the waters, new Anglo immigrants quickly set to damming the Santa Cruz for fun and profit. Tucson soon had two lakes.

Silver Lake, now memorialized in the road of the same name, was created in the 1860s when James Lee put in a dam on the river a mile south of Sentinel Peak, now known as A Mountain. The lake's water power ran Lee's mill and provided wet recreation for the desert dwellers. Eventually a couple of bathhouses even cast their unlikely reflections onto the desert lake's surface.

Solomon Warner, not to be thwarted by Lee's capture of the waters, built his own dam to the north in about 1883, drawing water from the perennial spring and marshes at Sentinel Peak. He had a mill too. Both the lakes attracted hunters and fisherman, as well as weekend picnickers and bathers.

But Sam Hughes, immortalized in the name of a school and a posh Tucson neighborhood, did even more damage than the other Anglo tinkerers. In 1888, he cut a canal across the river downstream from Warner's mill Tellman believes it was in the vicinity of today's Arizona School for the Deaf and Blind. The idea was to grab some of the water in his new ditch and use it to irrigate fields north of town. It was a spectacular failure.

"The canal blew out and became a sort of river," Tellman says, "and eventually caused erosion all the way down to the [San Xavier] mission." The river henceforth was a permanent trench, eroded deep into the earth.

A growing population was cutting the riparian trees for firewood, to use for cooking and for heating. But Anglo technology again added to the carnage with the invention of a wood-fired water pump. This dramatically increased locals' ability to suck up the groundwater underneath the river. With this new, seemingly bottomless pool of water, farmers began to plant water-intensive crops--wheat, citrus and pecans--that had heretofore been unimaginable in the desert.

The new pumps were a double-edged disaster for the river habitat. Their insatiable appetite for wood further spurred the axing of the riverside bosques without the old trees, erosion of the riverbanks accelerated. And the pumps sucked up the groundwater that had kept the riverbank trees alive. The ancient cottonwoods began to die off.

By 1900, Tellman says, the U.S. Geological Survey found that "all of the low flow of the river was diverted before Congress Street."

Less than half a century after the Anglos arrived, the river was mortally wounded.

". the water was so clean, not polluted . it was beautiful. We used to have álamos (cottonwood trees), big, big, old trees, and we used to put ropes and tires on them and then we'd swing--BOOM!--right into the water."

--Julia Soto, remembering the Santa Cruz acequia that ran through Barrio Anita, quoted in the book A Path to the River, Memories of the Santa Cruz River and Barrio Anita.

One hundred years later, there's no shortage of ideas of what to do about the sorry state of the Santa Cruz.

Almost no one argues seriously for a return to the shallow little creek of old, and its wide marshy floodplain. Erosion has cut into its banks too much, and too many houses and roads have successfully taken root in its flood plain. But the city could go a long way toward making the brown ditch green, and restoring to the river its place as the heart of community life.

"There have been very successful rehabilitations of other streams in urban areas that we should look at," says Diana Hadley, a researcher at Arizona State Museum and a co-founder of the Santa Cruz River Alliance. "Beautification projects have returned amenities, if not in the original form, as least with a sense of beauty and of the desert riparian habitat."

A historian who is compiling a detailed chronology of the river, Hadley adds, "We could go a huge way toward restoring bird and amphibian habitats, and supporting mammals."

At the Alliance's conference on the river, keynote speaker Ann Riley, an expert on urban river rehabilitation, pointed out the errors of old-style river engineering. The things that engineers typically do to ward off floods--tame rivers with concrete walls, straighten up their meanders, and block their flows with dams and bridges--are the very things trigger more erosion and flooding, Riley said.

Hadley says the river itself rebels against the straight lines engineers try to impose. "Internal terraces are beginning to form (inside the Santa Cruz's concrete bed)," she notes. "The river tries to turn itself back to what it was. Water has a will. We need to work with that will."

Fonseca, the Pima County hydrologist, says there is plenty of water for the greening projects, quite apart from the Central Arizona Project water that starts gushing out of Tucson's spigots this week.

"The city and the county have already agreed to set aside 5,000 acre feet of effluent [treated sewer water] for use in riparian projects, for releases into the channel, for tree planting," she says. "By 2005, they're committed to 10,000 acre feet . That would support 1,500 acres of cottonwood and willow trees. If it's just mesquite, that would be 3,000 acres."

Fonseca says she was impressed by Riley's assertion that a river channel could be re-designed "for more stability without using soil cement." She hopes to launch a demonstration project of the principle on a piece of the Santa Cruz that's still innocent of concrete, south of downtown.

The Paseo de las Iglesias, she says, would complement the Rio Nuevo re-greening. The Paseo "will include recreation and cultural preservation, and interpret the great history along the river. The two anchors at either end will be San Xavier and the [restored] Convento site, emphasizing its religious significance, and its geological and hydrological significance."

A rehabbed river would be more than a natural and historical amenity. It could also add up to tourist bucks.

Water means birds, and "birds attract homo sapiens," the very species the Rio Nuevo planners are so eager to lure, Kevin Dahl, head of the Tucson Audubon Society, told conferees.

"There are more birders than there are golfers," Dahl says. In just the last year birders spent $251 million in Arizona, traveling, eating and sleeping, he says. Arizona has five of the top 10 ranked birding spots in the U.S. and a wet Santa Cruz just might turn into another one, might become the bird paradise that ornithologist Brandt found in the 1930s.

But, Fonseca cautions, we must "make sure we don't lose anything unwittingly. We need a better sense of what's left."

Right now, for example, Tucson Unified School District has proposed a bus depot near the west branch of the Santa Cruz at Mission and Silverlake. Not only would the oily depot jeopardize plans to revitalize the river, it would compromise its resident giant spotted whiptail lizard, which has somehow managed to survive decades of dryness.

Secondly, "we need to protect people from harm but we don't need to keep putting people in harm's way" by building in the flood plain," she says.

"Preserve what you've got left," Fonseca concludes. "Then think about what you can do to restore" what you've lost.

Life of the Santa Cruz River continues on exhibit through September 15 at the Arizona Historical Society, 949 E. Second St. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, and noon to 4 p.m. Sundays. Admission is free. For more information call 628-5775.

For this article Margaret Regan consulted Arizona's Changing Rivers: How People Have Affected the Rivers by Barbara Tellman, Richard Yarde and Mary G. Wallace (Water Resources Research Center, UA College of Agriculture, 1997) A Historical Study of the Santa Cruz River by Barbara Tellman and Richard Yarde (Water Resources Research Center, UA College of Agriculture, 1996) and Man and Wildlife in Arizona by Goode P. Davis Jr.


Operational history [ edit | edit source ]

Following acceptance and shakedown, she conducted pilot qualifications off the West Coast from October 1945 to March 1946. Thereafter she ferried aircraft to forward bases in WestPac. (Captain Donald S. McMahan took command 27 November 1947, serving until 22 April 1947 when he was replaced by Commander William A. Smyth.) She entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard on 3 March 1947 for inactivation was decommissioned on 30 June 1947 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet, Bremerton, Washington.

After the start of hostilities in Korea the ship was activated and recommissioned on 26 July 1951, with Captain Horace Butterfield in command. (He was replaced by Captain J.W. Davidson in December 1951, and Captain C.C. Marcy became commanding officer in November, 1951.) Point Cruz departed Bremerton on 4 January 1953 after coastal operations and an extensive overhaul modifying her for use as an anti-submarine warfare Hunter-Killer Group carrier. During the transit to San Diego, Point Cruz was damaged in a severe Pacific storm and repairs required several months.

Based at Sasebo, Japan, Point Cruz patrolled the Korean coast in the spring of 1953.(Captain John T. Hayward took command in July 1953.) After the armistice, she served as base for a helicopter squadron that took part in "Operation Platform", airlifting Indian troops to the Panmunjom buffer zone to supervise the prisoner of war exchange. (The incident on which the television movie "1,000 Men and a Baby" was based took place during Operation Platform.)

The CVE returned to San Diego in late December 1953, and after training and additional overhaul deployed to WestPac again on April 1954, under the command of Captain John T. Hayward. Captain Frederick J. Brush assumed command of the ship in May 1954. In the Far East the carrier served as command ship for Carrier Division 17 under Rear Admiral James S. Russell.

The ship returned to San Diego in November 1954, and deployed again on 24 August 1955 (shortly after Captain Brush was relieved by Captain A.R. Matter) .While in the Pacific operating with the 7th Fleet, she served as flagship of Carrier Division 15. Point Cruz departed Yokosuka on 31 January 1956 and arrived at Long Beach, California, in early February for inactivation at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. Decommissioned on 31 August 1956, CVE-119 was placed in the Bremerton Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet. While in a reserve status, she was redesignated an aircraft transport, AKV-19, on 17 May 1957.

Point Cruz was reactivated on 23 August 1965 and placed under the operational control of the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) as USNS Point Cruz (T-AKV-19) in September 1965. Commencing service as an aircraft ferry for MSTS, Point Cruz provided logistical support for American forces in South East Asia.


Mục lục

Nguyên dự định mang tên Trocadero Bay, con tàu được đổi tên thành Point Cruz vào ngày 5 tháng 6 năm 1944 trước khi được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu của hãng Todd Pacific Shipyards ở Tacoma, Washington vào ngày 4 tháng 12 năm 1944. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 18 tháng 5 năm 1945 được đỡ đầu bởi bà Earl R. DeLong, và nhập biên chế vào ngày 16 tháng 10 năm 1945 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Đại tá Hải quân Douglas T. Day.

Sau khi hoàn tất nghiệm thu và chạy thử máy, Point Cruz tiến hành hoạt động huấn luyện chuẩn nhận phi công tàu sân bay dọc theo vùng bờ Tây từ tháng 10 năm 1945 đến tháng 3 năm 1946. Sau đó nó đảm nhiệm vận chuyển máy bay đến các căn cứ tiền phương ở khu vực Tây Thái Bình Dương. Nó đi vào Xưởng hải quân Puget Sound vào ngày 3 tháng 3 năm 1947 để chuẩn bị ngừng hoạt động, và được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 30 tháng 6 năm 1947, được đưa về Hạm đội Dự bị Thái Bình Dương tại Bremerton, Washington.

Tuy nhiên, sự kiện lực lượng Bắc Triều Tiên tấn công xuống lãnh thổ Nam Triều Tiên vào ngày 25 tháng 6, 1950, khiến Chiến tranh Triều Tiên bùng nổ, đã buộc phải huy động trở lại Point Cruz, và nó được cho nhập biên chế trở lại vào ngày 26 tháng 7, 1951 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Đại tá Hải quân Horace Butterfield. Sau khi được đại tu và cải biến rộng rãi nhằm phù hợp cho vai trò tàu sân bay trong một đội đặc nhiệm tìm-diệt chống tàu ngầm, cùng những hoạt động huấn luyện tại chỗ dọc theo vùng bờ Tây, nó rời Bremerton, Washington vào ngày 4 tháng 1, 1953 để đi San Diego, California. Tuy nhiên, nó bị hư hại do gặp phải một cơn bão trên đường đi, và phải mất nhiều tháng để sửa chữa trước khi hướng sang khu vực Tây Thái Bình Dương.

Đặt căn cứ tại Sasebo, Nhật Bản, Point Cruz tuần tra ngoài khơi bờ biển Triều Tiên vào mùa Xuân năm 1953. Sau khi thỏa thuận ngừng bắn kết thúc cuộc xung đột được ký kết, nó phục vụ như một căn cứ cho một phi đội máy bay trực thăng tham gia vào Chiến dịch Platform, hoạt động không vận binh lính Ấn Độ đến vùng đệm Bàn Môn Điếm để giám sát việc trao đổi tù binh chiến tranh giữa các bên tham chiến. Chiếc tàu sân bay quay trở về San Diego vào cuối tháng 12, 1953, và sau các hoạt động thường lệ tại chỗ, huấn luyện và bảo trì, nó lại được phái sang Viễn Đông vào tháng 4, 1954, nơi nó phục vụ như soái hạm của Đội tàu sân bay 17 dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc James S. Russell.

Point Cruz quay trở về San Diego vào tháng 11, 1954, để rồi lại được bố trí sang khu vực Tây Thái Bình Dương vào ngày 24 tháng 8, 1955. Trong lượt hoạt động này, nó phục vụ cùng Đệ thất Hạm đội và đảm nhiệm vai trò soái hạm của Đội tàu sân bay 15, trước khi rời căn cứ Yokosuka, Nhật Bản vào ngày 31 tháng 1, 1956 để quay trở về nhà, về đến Long Beach, California vào đầu tháng 2, nơi nó được chuẩn bị để ngừng hoạt động. Con tàu được cho xuất biên chế một lần nữa vào ngày 31 tháng 8, 1956 và được đưa về Hạm đội Dự bị Thái Bình Dương tại Bremerton. Đang khi trong thành phần dự bị, nó được xếp lại lớp như một tàu vận chuyển máy bay với ký hiệu lườn AKV-19 vào ngày 17 tháng 5, 1957.

Trong Chiến tranh Việt Nam, Point Cruz được huy động trở lại vào ngày 23 tháng 8, 1965, và đặt dưới quyền điều động của Dịch vụ Hải vận Quân sự (MSTS: Military Sea Transportation Service) như là chiếc USNS Point Cruz (T-AKV-19) vào tháng 9, 1965. Nó làm nhiệm vụ vận chuyển hậu cần cho lực lượng Hoa Kỳ trú đóng tại Đông Nam Á, cho đến khi ngừng hoạt động vào ngày 16 tháng 10, 1969. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 15 tháng 9, 1970, và con tàu bị tháo dỡ vào năm 1971. [2]


Operational history

Following acceptance and shakedown, she conducted pilot qualifications off the West Coast from October 1945 to March 1946. Thereafter she ferried aircraft to forward bases in WestPac. (Captain Donald S. McMahan took command 27 November 1947, serving until 22 April 1947 when he was replaced by Commander William A. Smyth.) She entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard on 3 March 1947 for inactivation was decommissioned on 30 June 1947 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet, Bremerton, Washington.

After the start of hostilities in Korea the ship was activated and recommissioned on 26 July 1951, with Captain Horace Butterfield in command. (He was replaced by Captain J.W. Davidson in December 1951, and Captain C.C. Marcy became commanding officer in November, 1951.) Point Cruz departed Bremerton on 4 January 1953 after coastal operations and an extensive overhaul modifying her for use as an anti-submarine warfare Hunter-Killer Group carrier. During the transit to San Diego, Point Cruz was damaged in a severe Pacific storm and repairs required several months.

Based at Sasebo, Japan, Point Cruz patrolled the Korean coast in the spring of 1953.(Captain John T. Hayward took command in July 1953.) After the armistice, she served as base for a helicopter squadron that took part in " Operation Platform ", airlifting Indian troops to the Panmunjom buffer zone to supervise the prisoner of war exchange. (The incident on which the television movie "1,000 Men and a Baby" was based took place during Operation Platform.)

The CVE returned to San Diego in late December 1953, and after training and additional overhaul deployed to WestPac again on April 1954, under the command of Captain John T. Hayward. Captain Frederick J. Brush assumed command of the ship in May 1954. In the Far East the carrier served as command ship for Carrier Division 17 under Rear Admiral James S. Russell.

The ship returned to San Diego in November 1954, and deployed again on 24 August 1955 (shortly after Captain Brush was relieved by Captain A.R. Matter) .While in the Pacific operating with the 7th Fleet, she served as flagship of Carrier Division 15 . Point Cruz departed Yokosuka on 31 January 1956 and arrived at Long Beach, California, in early February for inactivation at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. Decommissioned on 31 August 1956, CVE-119 was placed in the Bremerton Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet. While in a reserve status, she was redesignated an aircraft transport, AKV-19, on 17 May 1957.

Point Cruz was reactivated on 23 August 1965 and placed under the operational control of the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) as USNS Point Cruz (T-AKV-19) in September 1965. Commencing service as an aircraft ferry for MSTS, Point Cruz provided logistical support for American forces in South East Asia.


CVE-119 U.S.S. Point Cruz - History

Jan-Dec 1953 Korean Cruise Book (RARE FIND)

A great part of naval history. (Most Sailors consider the cruise book one of their most valued treasures)

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Point Cruz cruise book during the Korean War era. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

Over 385 photos and the ships story told on 169 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Escort Aircraft Carrier during the Korean War.


California Saw Mills, 1874

The number of mills enumerated in the following table, compiled from the County Assessor's returns of 1874, is three hundred and eighty-eight, of which two hundred and twenty-four are propelled by steam, one hundred and sixty by water, and four by steam and water. The cost of these mills vary from $1,000 to S80,00l), with from one to five saws, and a capacity of from one thousand to eighty thousand feet of lumber per day. All of those in San Francisco County and a few in other counties are planing mills, being engaged almost exclusively in the manufacture of dressed lumber and other building material. In several counties, particularly Butte, El Dorado, Humboldt, Mendocino, Nevada, Placer, San Mateo, and Santa Cruz, the manufacture of lumber is a very important branch of industry, large and expensive mills having been erected, which give employment to a large number of men.

Location, Name of Mill, and Occupant's Name of each by County

Alpine County
Blue Lake, Grant, Curts & Griffiths.
Carey's Mills, Carey's Mills, W. B. Lake.
Fredericksburg, Cast Iron, W. Smith.
Markleeville, Grant, Curts & Griffiths.
Markleeville, Buena Vista, Johnson & Barber.
Mid. Carson River, Buena Vista, Toby & Mason.
Silver King Valley, Smith's, Smith & Company.
Silver King Valley, Minnesota, W. H. H. Graham
Silver Mountain, Davidson's, D. Davidson.
Silver Mountain, Dennis & Gilman, S. B. Gilman.
Silver Mountain, Exchequer, Exchequer Company.
Silver Mountain, Robinson, J. S. S. Robinson.

Amador County
Antelope, Butterfield, F. M. Whitmore.
Antelope Creek, Fithean & Co's., Brandon & Miller.
Antelope Creek, Mace's, F. Mace.
Volcano, Leslie's, Leslie & Son.

Butte County
Chico Ridge, Arcade, McCormick & Brother.
Chico Ridge, Belmont, Butte Flume & Lumber Company.
Chico Ridge, Cascade, Butte Flume & Lumber Company.
Chico Ridge, Dashaway, E. Finley.
Chico Ridge, Excelsior, W. K. Springer.
Chico Ridge, Victor, W. K. Springer.
Chico Ridge, Yelper, William Bonham.
Clipper Mills, Clipper, Union Lumber Company.
Concow Valley, Mullen's, J. Mullen & Company.
Dogtown Ridge, Buckeye, John Hupp.
Dogtown Ridge, Casey's, B. Casey & Company.
Dogtown Ridge, Fairfield, William Hasty.
Dogtown Ridge, Green's, Cohn & Taber.
Dogtown Ridge, McKay's, Chico Lumber Company.
Dogtown Ridge, Nimshew, Dufour & Company.
Dogtown Ridge, Puckett's, S. Marks.
Dogtown Ridge, Saterlee's, A. B. Saterlee.
Dogtown Ridge, Star, Doon & Morris.
Flea Valley, Flea Valley, Flea Valley Mill Company.
Mooretown, Roger's, Geo. B. Rogers & Company.
Mountain House, Turner's, Turner & Farnham.

Calaveras County
Big Trees, Kimball & Cutting, Kimball & Cutting.
El Dorado, Eureka, J. Burt.
Love's Creek, Love & McGaffey's,
Railroad Flat, Clark's, W. V. Clark.
Railroad Flat, McCarty's, D. McCarty.

Colusa County
Stoney Creek, Foutz's, ____ Foutz.

Contra Costa County
Pacheco, Pacheco, H. N. Dalton.

Del Norte County
Bunker Hill, Independence, Northern Hydraulic Company.
Crescent City, Coast, T. Van Pelt.
Crescent City, Elk River, Hobbs, Pomeroy & Company.
Happy Camp, Doolittle's, Happy Camp Company.
Indian Creek, Junction, Happy Camp Ditch Company.
Lake Earl, Lagoon, C. C. Mill Company.
Smith River, Lake's, J. L. Lake.

El Dorado County
Consumnes, Farnham's, _____ Farnham.
Consumnes, Putnam's, W. H. Putnam.
Consumnes, Tyler's, R. S. Tyler.
Diamond Spring, Cold Springs, M. G. Griffith.
Diamond Spring, Diamond, M. G. Griffith.
Diamond Spring, Hooper & Companys, H. O. Hooper & Company.
Diamond Spring, North Weber, Ch. Sibeck.
Diamond Spring, Sly Park, Cutler & Card.
Diamond Spring, Stone Breaker, Griffith & Bryant.
Elkhorn, Elkhorn, J. & J.
Georgetown, Canon Creek, Blair, Pease & Company.
Georgetown, Grasser Place, Pease & Company.
Georgetown, Rock Canon, Robert Noble.
Kelsey, Bear Creek, Heirs W. H. Hollingsworth.
Mount Gregory, Mt. Gregory, Pease & Company.
Placerville, Ashland, Jones & Blanchard.
Placerville, Pacific, Jones & Blanchard.
Placerville, Sportsman's Hall, J. & J. Blair.
Pleasant Valley, Baltic, Louis Lepetit.
Spanish Flat, Demith's, H. Demiths.

Fresno County
Fresno Flats, Green & Sharpton, Green & Sharpton.
Fresno River, California, Cal. Lumber Company.
Mill Creek, Wagey's, P. Wagey & Son.
Pine Ridge, Clipper, Glass & Donahue.
Pine Ridge, Humphrey's, Humphrey & Mock.
Pine Ridge, Phoenix, A. C. Jack & Company.
San Joaquin N. F., Herron's, J. M. Herron.
San Joaquin N. F., McCullough's, George Green.

Humboldt County
Areata, Dolly Varden, Minor & Falk.
Eureka, Bay, Dolbeer & Carson.
Eureka, Eureka, B. R. Jones & Company.
Eureka, Fay's, Fay Brothers.
Eureka, Howitt & Co's, Howitt & Company.
Eureka, Island, Russ, Pickard & Co.
Eureka, Jones & Co's, D. K. Jones & Company.
Eureka, Occidental, Evans & Company.
Eureka, Vance's, John Vance.
Ferndale, Pacific, Joseph Russ.
Hydesville, Wright & Langdon's, Wright & Langdon.
Mattolo, Mattolo, Hubert & Dudley.
Rohnerville, Rohnerville, Martin & Kellogg.
Salmon Creek, Babcock's, Orville Simmons.
Trinidad, Smith & Dougherty's, Smith & Dougherty.
Trinidad, Hooper's, Hooper & Company.

Into County
Big Pine, Bell's, Stewart & Company.
Bishop Creek, Bishop Creek, T. D. Lewis.
Black Rock, Black Rock, Jas. W. Smith.
Cottonwood Creek, Stevens, Stevens & Company.

Kern County
Greenhorn Mountain, Harmon's, M. E. Harmon.
Greenhorn Mountain, R. H. Evans, R. H. Evans.
Livermore, Livermore's, H. P. Livermore.
Piute Mountain, Barton Bro's, H. Barton & Brothers.
San Emigdie, San Emigdie, John Funk.
Tehichipa, Brite's, J. M. Brite.
Tehichipa, Humiston & Co's, L. F. Humiston & Company.

Klamath County
Hoopa Valley, Hoopa Valley, U. S. Government.
Orleans, Graham's, J. W. Graham.
Orleans, J. A. Pearch's, J. A. Pearch.
Salmon River, Main, Nordheimer Creek, A. Bahr.
Salmon River, E. F., Crawford's, W. P. Bennett.
Salmon River, S. F., Ritner's, J. P. Ritner.
Sawyer's Bar, Sawyer's Bar, J. T. Barrows.
South Fork of Trinity, Campbell's, T. G. Campbell.
Willow Creek, Dart's Mill, J. Ziegler.

Lake County
Cobb's Valley, Pacific, Mat. Harbin.
Cobb's Valley, Standiford, Wm. Gordon.
Mount Hanah, Moore's, L. Carson & Company.
N. of Clear Lake, Bateman, L. A. Young.
Pine Mountain, American, Americano Q. S. Company.
Pine Mountain, Rico, H. W. Rice.
Pope Mountain, Loconome, B. Knawer.
Upper Lake, Dennison, A. J. Stroup & Company.

Lassen County
Big Valley, Murdock's, Murdock & Quinn.
Big Valley, Willow Creek, Lonkey & Lapoint.
Janesville, Adams, J. W. Cornelison.
Janesville, Byer's, Byers & Company.
Milford, Fairchild, T. H. Fairchild.
Susan River, Stockton, H. C. Stockton.

Los Angeles County
Los Angeles, Perry & Woodworth's, Perry, Woodworth & Company.
Los Angeles, Griffith, Lynch & Co's, Griffith, Lynch & Company.

Marin County
White Ranch, Shaver's, Isaac Shaver.

Mariposa County
Coulterville, Hoborn's, ____ Hoborn.
Snow Creek, Clark's, D. Clark.
Sweet Water, Malone's, J. H. Malone.

Mendocino County
Albion River, Albion, McPherson & Wetherbee.
Anderson Valley, Gschwind's, _____.
Brush Creek, Sander's, A. Sanders.
Cahto, Simpson's, J. H. Simpson.
Casper Creek, Casper, J. G. Jackson.
Elk Creek, Elk Creek, T, Murray.
Garcia River, Garcia, Nickerson & Company.
Gualala River, Gaulala, Heywood & Harmon.
Little Lake, Blosser's, Blosser Brothers.
Little River, Little River, Cromby & Perkins.
Mendocino, Mendocino, Mendocino Mill Company.
Navarro River, Navarro, Tichenor & Bixbee.
Noyo River, Noyo, McPherson & Wetherbee.
Point Arena, Ross & Francis, Ross & Francis.
Redwood Valley, Reed's, Eraser & Brown
Reed's Redwoods, Reeves, T. Reeves.
Round Valley, Gray's, U. S. Government.
Sherwood Valley, Hatch's, U. T. Hatch.

Merced County
Merced, Pioneer, Isaacs & Richardson.

Modoc County
Big Valley, McDevitt's, W. S. McDevitt.
Camp Bidwell, Brown & Jopp's, Brown & Jopps.
Cedarville, Russell's, Russell & Company.
Goose Lake Valley, Snider's, A. Snider.
Hot Spring Valley, Cannon Creek, Frank Cooley.
Hot Spring Valley, Porter's, Porter Brothers.
Lake City, Metzgar's, Jno. Metzgar.

Mono County
Adobe Meadows, McGee's, Hightower & Sanguinette.
Antelope Valley, Antelope, N.W. Hatch.
Buckeye Canon, Eagle, Towle & Hunewell.
Hot Spring Canon, Patterson's, K. S. Patterson.

Nevada County
Bloomfield Township, Bloomfield, James Cregan.
Bloomfield Township, Little Grass Valley, J. C. Broderick.
Bloomfield Township, Star, Eureka Lake and Yuba.
Bloomfield Township, Fridgeon & Company, Pridgeon & Company, Canal Company.
Eureka, Milton, V. G. Bell, Supt.
Eureka, Snow Tent, L. B. Churchill.
Graniteville, Eureka, Eureka Lake and Yuba.
Grass Valley, Shaw's, John Shaw. Canal Company
Grass Valley Township, Fuller's, P. J. Fuller.
Grass Valley Township, Grass Valley, Joseph Perrin.
Grass Valley Township, Mohawk Lumber Company, R. McMurray, Supt.
Little York, Voss (2 mills), Louis Voss.
Meadow Lake, Alder Creek, Jas. Machomich, Agent.
Meadow Lake, Boca Mill and Ice Co. L. E. Doane, Supt.
Meadow Lake, Bragg & Folsom's, Bragg & Folsom.
Meadow Lake, Nevada and California, O. Lonkey.
Meadow Lake, Truckee Lumber Company, Edward J. Brickell, Supt.
Nevada, Chapman's, C. K. Chapman.
Nevada, Cooper's, George Cooper.
Nevada, Flume Lumber Company, Harvey Cooper, Supt.
Nevada, Marsh's (2 mills), M. L. & D. Marsh.
Nevada, Scotch Flat, Smith & Mills.
Truckee, Ellen's, E. Ellen.
Washington Township, Fall Creek, James Culbertson.

Placer County
Alta (near), Alabama, Towle Brothers.
Alta (near), Kearsage, Al. Towle.
Alta (near), Rock Creek, Towle Brothers.
Coldstream, Stanford, Jno. Kneeland.
Dutch Flat (near), Water Mill, _____.
Emigrant Gap, Avery's, Avery & Sons.
Emigrant Gap, Putnam's (2 mills), Putnam & Company.
Emigrant Gap, (near), Culbertson's, Jas. Culbertson.
Martis Valley, McFarland's, _____ McFarland.
Martis Valley, Richardson Bros., Richardson Brothers.
Martis Valley, Schaffer's, Geo. Schaffer.
Tamarack, Mountain, Goo. Geissendorfer.

Plumas County
American Valley, Gansner's, F. Gansner.
American Valley, Hartwell's, J. F. Hartwell.
Big Meadows, Lawrence's, H. C. Lawrence.
Butte Valley, McBeth's, John McBeth.
Dutch Hill, Lawrence & Young, Lawrence & Young.
Eureka Mountain, Eureka, Eureka Company.
Greenville, Hough & Co., Hough & Company.
Humbug Valley, Wallick's, E. Wallick.
Indian Valley, _____, M. S. Ascheim
Indian Valley, Lawrence's, Estate of W. H. Blood.
Indian Valley, Taylor's, J. T. Taylor.
Indian Valley, Young's, H. Holthouse.
La Porte, La Porte, Union Lumber Company.
Meadow Valley, Jack's, Richard Jacks.
Mohawk Valley, Woodward, Isaac Hurley.
Onion Valley, Overton's, Jno. Porter.

Sacramento County
Sacramento, Capital, Theiss & Company.
Sacramento, Hotchkiss, Hotchkiss & Company.
Sacramento, Mechanics, Hobby & Taft.

San Bernardino County
Grass Valley, Clipper, Vanslyke & Somers.
Grass Valley, Grass Valley, Tyler Brothers.
Hunsacker, Metcalf's, John Metcalf.
Little Bear Valley, Lapraix, Wm. Lapraix.
Little Bear Valley (near), Bear Valley, Wm. Caley & Company.

San Diego County
Agua Caliente, Shaw's, Shaw & Ijams.
Cuyamaca, Duprez, Jose E. Duprez.
San Diego, Hanlon's, John Hanlon.
San Diego, Herrander's, John Herrander.
San Diego, San Diego, W. W. Terry & Company.

San Francisco County
San Francisco, Beale Street, Daniel D. Holland.
San Francisco, California, California Mill Company.
San Francisco, Enterprise, D. A. McDonald & Company.
San Francisco, Excelsior, William A. Meeker.
San Francisco, Mechanics, Wells, Russell & Company.
San Francisco, South Park, F. Korbel & Brothers.
San Francisco, South Point, A. M. Jewell & Company.
San Francisco, Thomas, C. W. Thomas.

San Luis Obispo County
Cambria, Cambria, Joseph Johnson.
Cambria, Lettingwell & Sons, Leffingwell & Sons.
San Luis Obispo, Santa Rosa, William Gillespie.
San Luis Obispo, Santa Rosa, W. Leffingwell.

San Mateo County
Garzos Creek, Garzos, Hanson & Company.
Haskin's Mill, _____ Haskins.
Pescadero, Burch & Company, Burch & Company.
Pescadero, Carter's, Johnson & Company.
Pescadero, Carter's, Johnson & Company.
Pescadero, Spaulding & Companys., Spaulding & Company.
Pescadero, Tufley's, John Tufley's.
Pescadero, Voris, I. N. Voris,
Pescadero, Voris, N. Voris,
Pescadero, Waddell's, W. W. Waddell & Company.
Pescadero, Creek, B. Haywood.
Purissima, Creek, A. Peers.
San Gregorio, Templeton's, H. Templeton.
Summit, S. P. Pherris, S. P. Pherris.
Taylor's Mill, _____, _____ Taylor.
Templeton's Gulch, Hanson & Ackerson's, Hanson & Ackerson.
Tornitas Creek, Froment, Frement & Company.

Santa Clara County
Gilroy, Gilroy, Hodge & Whitehurst.
Uvas Creek, Chase's, S. H. Chase.

Santa Cruz County
Aptos Creek, Nichols, B. C. Nichols & Brothers.
Brancefort Creek, Warner's, D. Lear.
Fall Creek, Ashley's, Otis Ashley.
Fall Creek, Otto's, George Otto.
Fall Creek, Otto's, George Otto.
Felton, Treat's, George Treat.
Pete's Creek, Pioneer, Page & Peers.
San Lorenzo River, Ellsworth's, J. W. Ellsworth.
San Lorenzo River, Hicks', Hicks Brothers.
San Lorenzo River, Silver's, S. Merrill.
Santa Cruz, Davis & Cowells', Davis & Cowell.
Santa Cruz, Glassell's, _____.
Soquel, Bates', Gardner & Company.
Soquel, Soquel, Soquel Lumber Company.
Soquel, Savage,
Watsonville, Clipper, Ford & Sanborn.
Watsonville, Corralites, Ryder, Orton & Company.
Watsonville, Eureka, Ford & Sanborn.
Watsonville, Game Cock, Ford & Sanborn.
Watsonville, Shingle Mill, Ford & Sanborn.
Watsonville, Shingle Mill, John Hunt.
Watsonville, Planing Mill, Ford & Sanborn.
Williams Landing, Jones, Hatch & Company.

Shasta County
Battle Creek, Vilas', M. R. Vilas.
Battle Creek, Klotz', Klotz & Company.
Bear Creek, Charles, Sidney Charles.
Clear Creek, Camden's, Charles Camden.
Cow Creek, Webb's, John P. Webb.
Fall River, Dina's, L. Dana.
Fall River, Cook & Winter's, Cook & Winter.
Hat Creek, Baker's, H. H. Baker.
Oak Run, Myers, George Myers.
Spring Creek, Spring Creek, Griffin & Company.
Whiskytown, Fleming's, John Fleming

Sierra County
Brandy City, _____, Marks & Company.
China Flat, Whitney's, D. L. Whitney.
Dog Valley, Dixon's, John Dixon.
East Fork, East Fork, Benjamin Pauley,
Eureka, Crooks & Meredith's, G. Meredith.
Eureka, Goodrich, G. Meredith.
Forks of Canon Creek, _____, Marks & Company.
Gibsonville, _____, Meikle Bros.
Goodyear's Bar, Stewart, Stewart & Company.
Howard Ranch, Whitney's, D. L. Whitney.
Mountain House, _____, D. F. Cole.
Pike City, _____, Nelson & Company.
Randolph, _____, S. B. Parker.
Rock Creek, _____, A. J. McGuire.
Scales, _____, Chandler & Company.
Sierra City, Macklin, O'Leary & Roberts.
Sierra Valley, _____, _____ Fletcher.
Sierra Valley, _____, Cobb & Company.
Sierra Valley, _____, Hamlin & Herrican.
Sierra Valley, _____, _____ Wooden.

Siskiyou County
Butteville, Summit, R. P. Hirst.
Cottonwood Creek, Cottonwood, William H. Smith.
Etna, Rough & Ready, M. E. Pitman.
French Creek, Festus Payne.
Kidder Creek, Oliver, Wright Brothers.
Little Shasta River, Cleland, J. S. Cleland.
Quartz Valley, Bean's, E. Bean.
Scott River, Jackson's, J. B. Ledue.
Shasta Valley, Maxwell, J. M. Dobkins.
Strawberry Valley, Stone & Ross, Stone & Ross.
Yreka, Lamb & Co's, Lamb & Company.

Sonoma County
Anally Township, Gifford's, Frank Gifford.
Anally Township, Ludolff's, Henry Ludolff.
Anally Township, Meeker's, Meeker Brothers.
Anally Township, Smith's, J. K. Smith.
Bodega, Fuller's, C. Fuller.
Mendocino, Norton's, Norton & Company.
Ocean, Duncan's, Alexander Duncan.
Redwood, Heald's, Heald & Gurne.
Redwood, Kerbel's, F. Korbel & Brothers.
Redwood, Mead's, Mead & Hassey.
Redwood, Head's, Murphy Brothers.
Salt Point, Miller's, William Miller.
Salt Point Township, Helmko, F. Helmko.
Stewart's Point, Bihler & Dingley, Bihler & Dingley.
Stewart's Point, Piatt's, Platt Mill Company.

Tehama County
Antelope, Belle, Empire Lumber Company.
Antelope, Champion, Empire Lumber Company.
Antelope, Yellow Jacket, Empire Lumber Company.
Battle Creek, Love, Blue Ridge Company.
Chico Creek, Arcade, _____ McCormick.
Chico Creek, Belmont, Allen & Company.
Chico Creek, Cascade, Allen & Company.
Coast Range, Mountain, Gillman & Patten.
Digger Creek, Blue Ridge No. 1.
Digger Creek, Blue Ridge No. 2.

Trinity County
Big Bar, Simond's, Simonds & Company.
Canon Creek, Guthrie's, William Guthrie.
Canon Creek E. F., Depinetto's, Joseph Dopinette
East Weaver Creek, Ware & Companys., William Ware & Company.
East Weaver Creek, E. F., Ware & Companys., William Ware & Company.
Hay Fork, Bayless', A. D. Bayless.
Hay Fork, Ewing's, Joseph Ewing.
Hyampom, Allen's, H. C. Allen.
Lewistown, Hoadley's, Taylor & Dack.
Swift Creek, Morrison's, E. Fader.
Trinity River, Bartlott & Evan's, _____ Evans.
Trinity River, McGillivray's, Joseph McGillivray.
Trinity River, Sturdivant's, Sturdivant & Whitmore.
Weaver Creek, Davidson's, R. N. Davidson & Company.
Weaverville, _____, Jumper & Company.

Tulare County
Foot of Sierras, Campbell's, H. Campbell.
Foot of Sierras, Hyde's, R. E. Hyde.
Foot of Sierras, Wagey's, Philip Wagey.
Old Tule River Pinery, Wilson's, D. E. Wilson.
Tule River, Dillon's, N. P. Dillon.
Tule River, Thomas & Dunlap, Thomas & Dunlap.

Tuolumne County
Brown's Ranch, Bradford & Way's, Bradford & Way.
Garrote (No. 2), Rocca's, Golden Rock Water Company.
S. F. Stanislaus River, Center, J. B. Carter & Company.
Sugar Pine, Hale & Hale, George W. Hale.

Ventura County
Gilroy, Ricketts & Co's., Ricketts & Company.
Lexington, Coval's, Coval Brothers.
Lexington, McMillen's, McFarland & Company.
San Buenaventura (near), Bernard's, Irvine Bernard.

Yuba County
Deadwood Creek, Deadwood, Union Lumber Company.
Now York Township, Challenge, Union Lumber Company.
Oak Valley, Oak Valley, James Gray.
Oregon Hill, Cottage, Union Lumber Company.
Sharon Valley, Sharon Valley, L. T. Crane & Brothers.

Source: Pacific Coast Business Directory for 1876-78, Compiled by Henry G. Langley, San Francisco, 1875

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USS Point Cruz (CVE-119)

Авіаносець «Пойнт-Круз» був закладений 4 грудня 1944 року на верфі «Todd Pacific Shipyards» у Такомі під назвою «Trocadero Bay», але пізніше перейменований на «Пойнт-Круз», на честь Пойнт-Круза — передмістя міста Хоніара, важливого місця битви за Гуадалканал. Спущений на воду 18 травня 1945 року, вступив у стрій 16 жовтня 1945 року.

Після вступу у стрій «Пойнт-Круз» після нетривалої служби 30 червня 1947 року був виведений у резерв.

Після початку Корейської війни, у липні 1951 року корабель був виведений з резерву та переведений на Тихий океан, де ніс службу у складі 7-го флоту як протичовновий авіаносець. З квітня по грудень 1953 року авіаносець здійснював підтримку військ на фронті.

Після закінчення війни авіаносець продовжував нести службу у складі Тихоокеанського флоту.

31 черпня 1956 року корабель був виведений у резерв. 7 травня 1959 року перекласифікований в авіатранспорт AKV-19.

У 1965 році авіаносець знову був виведений з резерву і до 1969 року використовувався для перевезення літаків у Південно-Східну Азію.

15 вересня 1970 року корабель був виключений зі списків флоту і наступного року проданий на злам.

  • Энциклопедия авианосцев. Под общей редакцией А. Е. Тараса / Минск, Харвест Москва, АСТ, 2002
  • Авианосцы Второй мировой. Новые властелины океанов. //С. А. Балакин, А. В. Дашьян, М. Э. Морозов. — М.:Коллекция, Яуза, 2006. ISBN 5-699-17428-1
  • С. А. Балакин — Авианосцы мира. 1939—1945. Великобритания, США, СССР.
  • Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships, 1922—1946 / US Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-0870219139

Вікісховище має мультимедійні дані за темою: USS Point Cruz (CVE-119)


USS Point Cruz Reunion remembers “The Navy’s Baby”

Daniel Keenan, left, Clay Cooper, and Shirley Keenan.

BRANSON, Mo., September 17, 2012 — What does the reunion of the USS Point Cruz in Branson, September 10 – 14 of 2012 have to do the with an emaciated near death two month old Korean Caucasian baby in a Korean orphanage in 1953? Actually, quite a bit according to Daniel Edward Keenan, who was that dying baby. “If not for the intervention of the Point Cruz, I would not be here today. They literally saved my life,” he said.

Keenan and the Point Cruz first “met” in September of 1953 when the carrier escort docked at Inchon Harbor, in South Korean. Its Chaplain, LTJG Edward O. Riley, while responding to a request for assistance from Sister Philomena de la Croix, the head of the French Catholic Orphanage caring for 400 babies, discovered an emaciated, near death, blue eyed, fair skinned, baby with blond hair, called “George,” amid all the Korean babies. Knowing that the chances of survival for a half blood Caucasian baby were slim Riley went back to the ship and explained the situation to its “Skipper,” Captain John T. Hayward, who instructed him to go back to the orphanage and to not return to the ship without the baby.

Although it was against all military regulations, not a “one trip” to the orphanage situation and took the intervention of visiting Vice President Richard Nixon, the “Baby George” not only came to the ship, but the necessary Korean Pass Port and U.S. Visa paper work was completed for him to come to the United States within mere weeks. As unlikely as this seems in this day and age Baby George went aboard a U.S. Naval vessel and into the welcoming arms of its 1,000 plus man crew, who treated him as a “member” of the families they were so far away from and to whom they longed to return.

Not only was George piped aboard the ship like a visiting dignitary, he went into a “nursery ” the crew had prepared with a crib and playpen, handmade toys and an environment under which “George,” or “Baby-san” as he was sometimes called, flourished. The stories tell how sheets were cutup into diapers, the crew took turns changing his diapers, anxiously awaited the daily reports on his improving condition and gathered to see him whenever the PA Announcement was made that the baby “would be on the hanger deck” or was wheeled around the ship in a modified “bomb carrier” baby carriage. Imagine, a U.S. Navy ship with diapers hanging from the “yard arm.” So unique and touching was the story that it was made into a TV movie entitled, “A Thousand Men and a Baby,” which aired on CBS in 1997.

During the process, a doctor from the hospital ship USS Consolation, Lt. Hugh C. Keenan, who had treated him and examined him for his Visa indicated a desire to adopt him and obtained the enthusiastic long distance sight unseen agreement of his wife to do so. When the USS Point Cruz arrived in Japan, “Baby George” was “piped” off the ship and, with Chaplain Riley, boarded the USNS General Hugh J. Gaffey, a transport ship for transportation to the United States. When “George” disembarked from the ship in Seattle, Washington, December 12, 1953 in the arms of a Navy Nurse he was transferred directly into the waiting arms of his “mother” Genevieve Keenan.

“George,” was renamed Daniel Edward Keenan, “Daniel” being his dad’s father’s name and “Edward” after Chaplain Riley. It was over 40 years before “The Baby” and crew of the Point Cruz” met again. That was in a tearful celebration at the ships second reunion in 1993. Keenan has attended the vast majority of them since, including the one just completed in Branson, Missouri.

Julie Peters, Group Sales Manager with Branson Tourism Center’s Group Sales, worked closely with the USS Point Cruz in planning and holding their reunion., She said that in addition to participating in the fellowship and camaraderie of a military reunion, they also went to see Clay Cooper’s Country Music Express, SIX and The Yakov Smirnoff Show. Peters points out that while the group was at Clay Cooper’s Show he recognized them and asked Keenan to share the story with the audience. Peters said that it’s always a special pleasure to work on Military Reunions and getting to hear the story behind “A Thousand Men and a Baby” was a special personal highlight.

What are the odds on that, Keenan and his wife Shirley would, on their own, elect to go to see the Branson production of the Price Is Right, Live Show, be selected at random as one of the contestants and win $2,500? Insignificant as compared to the odds involved with what happened to a near death baby named “George” more than half a century ago, but wonderful nevertheless.


Watch the video: 1950s. NAVY PACIFIC FLEET DOCUMENTARY COMMAND OF THE SEAS KOREAN WAR 76424


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